Agent Casey Close rips the Astros and Major League Baseball over how they’re handling the Brady Aiken situation


The Astros selected Brady Aiken as the first overall pick in the draft last month. But then he developed some sort of arm issue — maybe — and now the Astros are trying to play hardball with him in order to get him to agree to a lower-than-expected bonus with the signing deadline looming on Friday. Aiken’s agent, Casey Close, is not pleased. Ken Rosenthal relays Aiken’s comments:

“We are extremely disappointed that Major League Baseball is allowing the Astros to conduct business in this manner with a complete disregard for the rules governing the draft and the 29 other clubs who have followed those same rules,” Close said.

The Astros and Major League Baseball, however, deny that anything untoward is happening (and Close does not specify what rule, exactly, he believes is being violated). What’s more, there is disagreement on whether or not Aiken is injured. The Astros have said that Aiken’s physical revealed “abnormalities” in his arm. Close says Aiken is perfectly healthy. Probably worth noting that Close does not have a reputation of a bomb-thrower as far as agents go.

Is this a tough-but-acceptable position the Astros are taking, or have they crossed a line? From a distance it’s impossible to tell. Nor is it at all clear if this is pre-signing deadline posturing or evidence of a significant rift that could derail the Aiken-Astros marriage. It’s certainly high-stakes stuff for Aiken and Close, in that if the sense takes hold that Aiken is somehow damaged goods it could affect his value later on down the line if he goes to college and then re-enters the draft.

Stay tuned.


Mike Trout has yet to strike out this spring

Rob Tringali/Getty Images

Everyone is well aware of how good Angels outfielder Mike Trout is at the game of baseball. The 26-year-old is already an all-time great, having won two MVP awards — and arguably deserving of two others — and the 2012 Rookie of the Year Award. He has accrued 54.2 WAR, per Baseball Reference, which is right around the threshold for a Hall of Fame career. Trout does it all: he draws walks, he hits for average, he hits for power, he steals bases, he plays good defense.

But here’s an achievement that is amazing even for a player like Trout: he has yet to strike out this spring. In 41 Cactus League plate appearances, he has 10 hits (including a triple and two homers) and six walks with zero strikeouts. Across his career, Trout has a 21.5 percent strikeout rate, right around the league average. He isn’t usually such a stickler for avoiding the punch-out, but this spring he is.

To put this in perspective, 134 players this spring have struck out at least 10 times, according to 938 players have struck out at least once. The only other players to have taken at least 10 at-bats without striking out this spring are Humberto Arteaga (Royals, 23 AB), Tony Cruz (Reds, 18 AB), Oscar Hernandez (Red Sox, 10 AB), and Jacob Stallings (Pirates, 18 AB).

According to Angels assistant hitting coach Paul Sorrento, the lack of strikeouts hasn’t been a conscious effort from Trout, Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports. Ho hum. The best player in baseball is apparently getting even better.