Jacob deGrom

And That Happened: Sunday’s scores and highlights

94 Comments

Mets 9, Marlins 1: How about this Jacob deGrom kid? He follows up a seven inning, zero run performance against the Braves with a seven inning, one run outing here. Plus he [altogether now] helped his own cause by hitting what we would have called the Game-Winning RBI if it was the 1980s and we still tracked things like Game-Winning RBI. Then we’d go watch “Alf” or “Night Court.” Or do some coke in our Wall Street office or posture against the Soviet Union. I dunno, I was just a kid then. That whole decade blurs together for me.

Giants 8, Diamondbacks 4: Madison Bumgarner gave up four runs. But he also drove in four runs, so I guess that’s OK. A grand slam for a pitcher. Don’t see that very often. Well, unless it’s Madison Bumgarner. He’s done it twice this year. It’s the first time a pitcher has done it twice in a year in 48 years. Oh, and Buster Posey hit a grand slam too. It’s the first time each member of a battery hit grand slams in the same game in the history of Major League Baseball.

Brewers 11, Cardinals 2: The Brewers arrest a seven-game skid and reclaim sole possession of first place. It was a 19-hit attack, led by Elian Herrera, who had five hits, including a double, and scored three times. Carlos Martinez had a forgettable game, giving up four runs in four innings and getting yelled at by the umpire for tossing his bat in frustration. Take a few days off, Carlos.

Nationals 10, Phillies 3: Jayson Werth homered and knocked in four. Ryan Zimmerman homered and drove in two. Ian Desmond drove in two without a homer. If you extend that pattern out long enough you run into a Zeno’s Arrow situation, I assume. Not gonna check, though. I already clicked out of the box score.

Braves 10, Cubs 7: Chris Johnson hit his third homer in two days, accounting for three of the runs in Atlanta’s four-run third inning. The Braves and Nats finish the first half tied for first place. Washington is one better in the loss column.

Royals 5, Tigers 2: The Royals avoided a four-game sweep thanks to a five-run seventh inning. Still, they blew an opportunity to gain ground on the Tigers and hit the break six and a half back.

Rays 3, Blue Jays 0: David Price, who is still a Ray for some reason, shut ’em out over eight. It’s his fourth win in four starts. Toronto is skidding into the break, having lost eight of ten.

Reds 6, Pirates 3: Kris Negron hit a three-run homer — his first ever — and Todd Frazier added a two-run shot. Frazier is in the Home Run Derby and you all are totally sleeping on him. He’s grip-it-and-rip it. Giancarlo Stanton is the safe bet, but I bet Frazier does really damn well. You heard it here first. And if he does poorly? Hell, I’ll just delete this comment. I have total control of this website.

Indians 3, White Sox 2: Yan Gomes drove in all three runs, including a go-ahead two-run homer in the eighth. Then, since he’s from Brazil, the White Sox scored seven straight goals off of him.

Red Sox 11, Astros 0: Remember when Clay Buchholz was dead back in May? Well, he’s back to life now. Three-hit shutout with 12 strikeouts. Brock Holt had five hits including a leadoff homer. Boston wins four of five heading into the break. Still nine back, but at least now their mini-vacation will be more pleasant.

Athletics 4, Mariners 1: Sonny Gray was on point once again, allowing nothin’ but an unearned run in seven and two-thirds.

Angels 10, Rangers 7: Mike Trout doubled twice and drove in four. He’s hitting .310/.400/.606 with 22 homers, 73 RBI and 10 stolen bases. And he’s younger than 14 of the 50 guys in yesterday’s Futures Game.

Twins 13, Rockies 5: Two homers for Brian Dozier. Maybe don’t sleep on him in the Home Run Derby either. It felt weird being in Target Field for baseball all day yesterday while the Twins were in Colorado. It was like having a party when your parents are out of town.

Dodgers 1, Padres 0: Four Dodgers pitchers combine to toss a four-hit shutout. I am picturing Bud Black throwing a bag of bats into the showers and telling his Padres hitter “it’s a miracle we got four.”

Orioles 3, Yankees 1: A rain-shortened win, featuring a Chris Davis two-run homer that was hit several hours before the rain shortened it. I’m sure Major League Baseball loved that the man of the week, Derek Jeter, is going to be getting to Minneapolis so late — or early, whichever — and be tired for all of the festivities.

Someone stole Jose Fernandez’s high school jersey after a vigil

MIAMI, FL - JULY 09:  Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins pitches during the game against the Cincinnati Reds at Marlins Park on July 9, 2015 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Rob Foldy/Getty Images)
Getty Images
4 Comments

People are the absolute worst sometimes. The latest example: someone stole one of Jose Fernandez’s high school jerseys, which had been displayed in his old high school’s dugout for a vigil last night.

That report comes from Anastasia Dawson of the Tampa Bay Times who covered the vigil at Alonso High School in Tampa yesterday. Her story of the vigil is here. Today she has been tweeting about the theft of the jersey. She spoke to Alonso High school’s principal who, in a bit of understatement, called the theft the “lowest of the low.”

The high school had one more Fernandez jersey remaining and has put it on display in the school. In the meantime, spread this story far and wide so that whatever vulture who stole it can’t sell it.

 

What Hall of Fame-eligible pitcher would you ask to pitch today?

Mike Mussina
Associated Press
30 Comments

In an earlier post I made a joke about the Indians starting Dennis Martinez if forced to play a meaningless (for them) game on Monday against the Tigers. On Twitter, one of my followers, Ray Fink, asked a great question: If you had to hand the ball to a Hall of Fame-eligible pitcher to give you three innings, who would it be?

The Hall of Fame-eligible part gets rid of the recently-retired ringers, requiring a guy who has been off the scene for at least five years, ensuring that there’s a good bit of rust. I love questions like these.

My immediate answer was Mike Mussina. My thinking being that of all of the great pitchers fitting these parameters, he’s the most likely to have stayed in good shape. I mean, Greg Maddux probably still has the best pitching IQ on the planet, but he’s let himself go a bit, right? Mussina strikes me as a guy who still wakes up and does crunches and stuff.

If you extend it to December, however, you may get a better answer, because that’s when Tim Wakefield becomes eligible for the Hall. I realize a knuckleball requires practice to maintain the right touch and subtlety to the delivery, but it also requires the least raw physical effort. Jim Bouton went well more than five years without throwing his less-than-Wakefield-quality knuckler and was still able to make a comeback. I think Tim could be passable.

Then there’s Roger Clemens. I didn’t see his numbers for that National Baseball Congress tourney this summer and I realize he’s getting a bit thick around the middle, but I’m sure he can still bring it enough to not embarrass himself. Beyond the frosted tips, anyway.

So: who is your Space Cowboys-style reclamation project? Who is the old legend you dust off for one last job?