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And That Happened: Wednesday’s scores and highlights


Diamondbacks 4, Marlins 3: Tied 1-1 into the tenth and the Marlins put up two in the top of the inning. The Dbacks rallied, though, with Paul Goldschmidt hitting a walkoff two-run double.

Angels 8, Blue Jays 7: Albert Pujols hit a go-ahead two-run homer in the seventh. The Angels’ pen did a nice job of picking up C.J. Wilson who gave up six runs (some unearned) and couldn’t make it out of the fourth.

Tigers 4, Dodgers 1: No Miguel Cabrera, no Victor Martinez, no problem. Max Scherzer stymied the Dodgers. Some sweet defense helped too, as the Dodgers’ first inning threat was put down by Eugenio Suarez caught Yasiel Puig napping and third and nailed him with a snap throw and Rajai Davis made a sliding catch in left.

Mets 4, Braves 1: Dillion Gee gave up one run over seven innings in his first start in two months. The Braves have now lost four straight following a nine-game winning streak to fall out of first place.

Rockies 6, Padres 3: Two homers for Tulo. Five homers overall for Colorado. The Padres seeing that kind of offensive outburst had to be like a caveman being transported to the 21st century in a time machine and seeing modern technology.

Twins 8, Mariners 1: The Twins scored eight runs by the time the fourth inning was over. According to the game story, the Twins players wanted to keep scoring: “We had guys screaming in the dugout, `It’s not illegal to score 10 runs!’ manager Ron Gardenhire said.” It’s a shame no one told them about the Restoring Pitching Act of 2013, which was passed in a bipartisan fashion. You’ll note that no one violated that law last night.

Astros 8, Rangers 4: The Astros sweep the Rangers and have moved past them into fourth place in the AL West, at least by percentage points. Robbie Grossman and George Springer homered for the Astros.

Giants 5, Athletics 2: San Francisco finally takes one from Oakland as the series moves to the west side of the bay. Jason Hammel takes the loss in his A’s debut.

Royals 5, Rays 4: Sal Perez brought K.C. back with a three-run homer in the ninth. The Royals now have a four game series against Detroit at home to take them into the break. They’re four and a half back of the Tigers. Pretty big stuff here.

Phillies 4 ,Brewers 1: Not a great time for the Brewers to drop three in a row to the lowly Phillies. Their lead in the Central is now down to two over the Cardinals and two and a half over the surging Reds.

Cardinals 5, Pirates 2: No walkoff win this time, but still a win. Bad news, though, as Yadier Molina sprained his right thumb and had to have an MRI after the game. The results should be known this morning. They really can’t afford to lose him.

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk’s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $30,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Thursday night’s MLB games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $5,000. Starts at 7:05pm ET on ThursdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Red Sox 5, White Sox 4: Sox win. Boston was down 4-0 in the eighth when Chris Sale got chased, but then rallied for five runs over the final two innings. One of Sale’s runners scored and then the White Sox pen couldn’t lock it down in the ninth. Daniel Nave and Brock Holt had the big hits in the ninth.

Nationals 6, Orioles 2: Doug Fister allowed two runs over seven innings and Washington hit three solo homers.

Reds 4, Cubs 1: A win, but a costly one for Cincy as they lose Billy Hamilton to a tweaked hamstring and as they watched Brandon Phillips roll over his left hand while attempting to make a play on an Anthony Rizzo grounder in the top of the eighth. Not great as the Pirates loom this weekend.

Yankees 5, Indians 4: Jacoby Ellsbury’s two-out homer in the 14th inning caps a long, otherwise bad day for the Yankees. I mean, Masahiro Tanaka is apparently dead (source: rumors) and Carlos Beltran broke his nose during batting practice. Losing this game wouldn’t have been the worst thing that happened all day, but still.

Red Sox sports medicine director says David Ortiz “was essentially playing on stumps”

BOSTON, MA - OCTOBER 1: David Ortiz #34 of the Boston Red Sox tips his helmet to the crowd as he exits the game after he singled during the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays at Fenway Park on October 1, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. (Photo by Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)
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David Ortiz had a whale of a final season with the Red Sox. It was so good that he was asked, many, many times, if he was thinking of reversing his retirement decision and coming back for 2017. Ortiz always said no, he was still retiring, occasionally making mention of his aching feet and the physical grind his 40-year-old body was undergoing.

We now know just how much of a grind it was. Indeed, it was extreme. We know this because Dan Dyrek, the Red Sox’ coordinator of sports medicine services, tells it to Rob Bradford of WEEI. Dyrek says that the injuries to Ortiz’s feet, which were often referred to as achilles tendon problems, were way, way more complicated than that, affecting every muscle, bone and tendon in his feet in chain reaction fashion. Dyrek:

“He was essentially playing on stumps. Instead of having this nice, flexible, foot, ankle, calf mechanism to act as a shock absorber, he was playing on stumps. And you can do that for only so long. He was in warrior mode trying to play through this. Once we diagnosed him and saw what was going on and started explaining things to him, there was actually a sense of relief because now he had an explanation of what he was in such excruciating pain.”

That Ortiz was able to even walk through what Dyrek describes is pretty amazing. That he was able to put up a near-MVP season with all of that pain is incredible.

Charlie Sheen would like to throw out the first pitch at a World Series game

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 21:  Actor Charlie Sheen attends Meghan Trainor's performance on NBC's "Today" at Rockefeller Plaza on June 21, 2016 in New York City.  (Photo by Mike Coppola/Getty Images)
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For all of the ups and downs of his personal and professional life, Charlie Sheen is and always has been a passionate baseball fan. Sheen once bought out an entire section of bleachers for an Angels game so he could catch a home run ball (he didn’t catch a home run ball). He starred in “Eight Men Out” and, more notably, “Major League.” That latter film earned him the love and admiration of Indians fans which lasts to this day.

Indeed, the love continues to be so great that, right after the Indians clinched the American League pennant, they began lobbying for Sheen to throw out the first pitch of a World Series game in Cleveland.  Yesterday afternoon Sheen took to Twitter, posted a pic of his baseball alter ego, and said that, if called upon, he would serve:

While it’s a big broad comedy, the scene in “Major League” in which Sheen comes out of the bullpen to “Wild Thing” blaring and the fans going nuts is legitimately chill-inducing. The fans at Progressive Field are already going to be amped up for the World Series as it is, but imagine how nuts the place would be if they recreated that scene.

Do it, Indians!

UPDATE: Wait, on reflection, don’t do it, Indians. Sheen is sort of a Trumpian figure in that his high profile craziness often causes us to momentarily forget his legitimate badness. We don’t need a guy like that tossing out the first pitch at the World Series.