Masahiro Tanaka injured: Yankees ace to undergo an MRI exam on his right arm

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After a spectacular start to his MLB career Masahiro Tanaka has looked somewhat human of late, allowing nine runs and a .333 opponents’ batting average in his last two starts. And now we may know why: According to George King the New York Post the Yankees right-hander is headed back to New York to undergo an MRI exam on his right arm.

No further details yet, but Tanaka has allowed a career-high number of runs in back-to-back starts, including five runs on 10 hits against the Indians last night. He tossed at least 100 pitches in 14 of his first 16 starts–including 116 on June 28–but has totaled just 85 and 99 pitches in his recent poor outings.

Tanaka is in line to potentially start the All-Star game for the AL with a league-leading 12 wins and a 2.52 ERA that ranks second to Felix Hernandez of the Mariners. He also leads the league with three complete games and has thrown 129 innings with a 135/19 K/BB ratio.

And now Yankees fans hold their collective breath waiting to hear news on the team’s $155 million ace.

UPDATE: For now the Yankees have placed Tanaka on the disabled list with what is being called elbow inflammation.

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.