Dayan Viciedo Getty

GM Rick Hahn plays White Sox’s hand close to vest once again

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BOSTON — The trade deadline is rapidly approaching and Rick Hahn already has his poker face on.

When it comes to his team’s rebuild, the White Sox general manager has no qualms admitting his job isn’t finished — there’s work to be done.

The White Sox, who improved to 43-47 with a 4-0 win over the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on Monday night, need better pitching, to know which way they’re going at catcher, in left field and at third base in order to become perennial contenders.

The team’s roster also features several players whom Hahn has indicated he’s willing to trade as well as others who are speculated to be on the block. But even with all those variables and rumors circulating about the futures of Dayan Viciedo and Adam Dunn — both of whom homered Monday — as well Gordon Beckham and Alejandro De Aza, Hahn is playing it cool.

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It’s a luxury he’s afforded unlike last season, when it was clear the White Sox needed to find a new direction and fast. So unless Hahn gets what he wants, the White Sox trade activity could be very limited over the next 3 1/2 weeks.

“There’s certainly no urgency to do anything,” Hahn said. “I think most of the players I’ve read about online that are rumored to be out there are all under control beyond this season. There’s no urgency to cash in an asset, so to speak, before it expires.”

The White Sox were an antique train wreck short on patience last July.

Not only were they on their way to 99 losses, the White Sox were built around an aging offensive core of Paul Konerko, Dunn and Alex Rios. If they had any hope of quickly turning things around, Hahn had to maximize the value of Jake Peavy and Rios, both of whom had a year left on their deals and trade appeal.

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Hahn netted outfielder Avisail Garcia and three minor-leaguers in the Peavy deal and then freed up playing time for their young outfielder in the trade of Rios to the Texas Rangers. Both moves gave the White Sox some of the financial flexibility they needed to sign Jose Abreu in the offseason.

In December, Hahn traded closer Addison Reed and Hector Santiago for prospect Matt Davidson and center fielder Adam Eaton. All of a sudden, the White Sox had a new identity in a span of five months.

That paradigm shift gives Hahn and the White Sox less urgency to be active.

Even though three infield prospects at Triple-A are knocking down the door — Micah Johnson is close, Marcus Semien has already produced in the bigs and Carlos Sanchez is back on track — Hahn isn’t forced into a deal because Beckham has a full season before he hits free agency.

Just because Hahn made it clear in December he’d part with either De Aza or Viciedo for the right price, neither is a free agent next season, which means he doesn’t have to just give them away. De Aza has another full season before he’s a free agent and Viciedo isn’t one until 2018.

Hahn isn’t blind to the notion his defense needs improvement and the offense needs more consistency, especially in the lower half. The pitching needs to be much better too and he’s aware of that as well.

Hahn said the White Sox, who entered Monday with 30 fewer runs scored than allowed this season, have earned their current record.

[ALSO: Abreu’s parents will fly to All-Star Game to watch son play]

“We really haven’t had that run of momentum of success that we hoped for,” Hahn said. “We’ve fallen into a couple of ruts along the way that last year was much more difficult for us to dig ourselves out of. We are pleased with that side to be able to stop the negative trends when they have come up on us.

“At the same time, we haven’t gone on that positive run of success that we’ve been waiting for that is going to put us in position to clearly be in the thick of a pennant race.”

He’s hopeful any moves he makes over the next 24 days to six months to next spring can aid in that cause. But he only intends to complete a deal if it fits the plan and giving away controlled contracts for less than fair value doesn’t seem to be part of it.

Hahn could be bluffing, but that doesn’t sound likely.

“We are willing to make a deal at any point where it makes most sense for or long-term interests,” Hahn said. “Whether that happens in the next two weeks or it takes until the offseason or spring training next year, we are not going to force the issue.”

Trevor May joins eSports team Luminosity

CLEVELAND, OH - AUGUST 04: Trevor May #65 of the Minnesota Twins pitches against the Cleveland Indians in the sixth inning at Progressive Field on August 4, 2016 in Cleveland, Ohio. The Indians defeated the Twins 9-2.  (Photo by David Maxwell/Getty Images)
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When he’s not throwing baseballs, Twins pitcher Trevor May is an active gamer. He streams on Twitch, a very popular video game streaming site, fairly regularly and now he’s officially on an eSports team. Luminosity Gaming announced the organization added May last Friday. It appears he’ll be streaming and commentating on Overwatch, a multiplayer first-person shooter made by Blizzard Entertainment.

May is the only current athlete to be an active member of an eSports team. Former NBA player Rick Fox owns Echo Fox, an eSports team that sports players in games including League of Legends, Super Smash Bros. Melee, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U, Street Fighter V, Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, and Mortal Kombat X. Jazz forward Gordon Hayward is also a known advocate of eSports.

The NBA in particular has been very active on the eSports front. Kings co-owners Andy Miller and Mark Mastrov launched NRG eSports in November 2015. Shortly thereafter, Grizzlies co-owner Stephen Kaplan invested in the Immortals eSports team. Almost a year later, the 76ers acquired controlling stakes in Team Dignitas and Team Apex. The same month, the Wizards’ and Warriors’ owners launched a group called Axiomatic, which purchased a controlling stake in Team Liquid, a long-time Starcraft: Brood War website which has since branched out into other games. And also in September 2016, Celtics forward Jonas Jerebko bought team Renegades, moving them to a group house in Detroit. In December 2016, the Bucks submitted a deal to Riot Games in order to purchase Cloud9’s Challenger league spot for $2.5 million. The Rockets that month hired someone specifically for eSports development, focusing on strategy and investment. Last month, the Heat acquired a controlling stake in team Misfits.

Once an afterthought, eSports has grown considerably in recent years and now it should be considered a competitor to traditional sports. League of Legends, in particular, is quite popular, reaching nearly 15 million concurrent viewers at its peak in the most recent League of Legends World Championship. That championship featured a prize purse of $6.7 million with $2 million of it being split among winner SK Telecom T1’s members.

Orioles re-sign Michael Bourn to a minor league deal

TORONTO, ON - OCTOBER 04:  Michael Bourn #1 of the Baltimore Orioles hits a single in the fifth inning against the Toronto Blue Jays during the American League Wild Card game at Rogers Centre on October 4, 2016 in Toronto, Canada.  (Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)
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The Orioles have re-signed outfielder Michael Bourn to a minor league contract with an invitation to major league camp, MASN’s Roch Kubatko reports.

Bourn, 34, joined the Orioles last year in a trade from the Diamondbacks on August 31. Though he compiled a meager .669 OPS with the Diamondbacks, Bourn hit a solid .283/.358/.435 in 55 plate appearances with the O’s through the end of the season.

Bourn, a non-roster invitee to camp, will try to play his way onto the Orioles’ 25-man roster. If he does make the roster, Bourn will receive a $2 million salary, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports points out.