Troy Tulowitzki

Troy Tulowitzki sounds like he wants to be traded to a contender

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By both versions of Wins Above Replacement, found at FanGraphs and at Baseball Reference, Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki has been the National League’s most valuable player. Tulo’s great season, however, has been wasted as the slumping Rockies — having won only three of their previous 19 games — are now 37-51, just a game and a half ahead of the Diamondbacks for last place in the NL West.

As non-contending teams are wont to do, the Rockies will consider trading some of their expensive, established veterans to acquire younger players in order to compete in future seasons. Among the trade candidates are Tulowitzki and outfielder Carlos Gonzalez. As Mark Kiszla of the Denver Post reports, the shortstop misses the feel of competitive baseball:

“In Todd Helton, there’s someone who’s easy to look at his career here and how it played out. I have the utmost respect for Todd, but at the same time, I don’t want to be the next in line as somebody who was here for a long time and didn’t have a chance to win every single year,” said Tulowitzki, reviewing the 17 years Helton spent as the face of a franchise that never won a division title. “He played in a couple postseason games and went to one World Series. But that’s not me. I want to be somewhere where there’s a chance to be in the playoffs every single year.”

Over the past seven seasons since Tulowitzki became the Rockies’ everyday shortstop, the Rockies have made the playoffs twice: they were swept in the 2007 World Series by the Red Sox, and they were knocked out in the 2009 NLDS by the Phillies in four games. The club has won 74 or fewer games four times and appear to be well on their way to a fifth this season. One can understand Tulowitzki’s frustration.

Tulowitzki, 29, leads the league in all three triple-slash categories at .350/.441/.608. He has hit 18 home runs and driven in 47 runs, along with his usual Gold Glove-caliber defense. Tulowitzki is earning $16 million this season and is still owed $20 million in each season between 2015-19. He’ll earn $14 million in 2020 and has a $15 million 2021 club option with a $4 million buyout.

Report: Marlins will retire Jose Fernandez’s No. 16

MIAMI , FL - SEPTEMBER 09:  Pitcher Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins throws against the Los Angeles Dodgers at Marlin Park on September 9, 2016 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)
Marc Serota/Getty Images
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The entire Marlins roster will wear the number 16 on the backs of their uniforms in remembrance of pitcher Jose Fernandez, who died in a boating accident on Sunday morning. After that? “No one will wear No. 16 for the Marlins again,” team owner Jeffrey Loria said on Monday evening, as Tyler Kepner of the New York Times reports.

Though Fernandez only pitched parts of four seasons for the Marlins, he already ranks fifth in career WAR in club history, according to Baseball Reference. He also owns the best career winning percentage as well as the second-lowest single-season ERA (2.19 in 2013) and the second-lowest single-season WHIP (0.979 in 2013). Fernandez was already one of the best pitchers in Marlins history and was on his way to becoming a perennial All-Star, if not a Hall of Famer.

Then add to that his outstanding personality and what he meant both to the Marlins organization and to the city of Miami. Loria has gotten a lot of criticism over the years, but he nailed it with this decision.

Report: Majestic workers stayed up all night making No. 16 jerseys for the Marlins

MIAMI, FLORIDA - APRIL 05:  Jose Fernandez #16 of the Miami Marlins looks on during 2016 Opening Day against the Detroit Tigers  at Marlins Park on April 5, 2016 in Miami, Florida.  (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)
Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images
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As Craig mentioned earlier, the Marlins will all wear No. 16 jerseys to honor pitcher Jose Fernandez, who tragically died in a boating accident on Sunday morning. It’s a fitting tribute as the Marlins return to the playing field after Sunday’s game was cancelled.

We don’t often hear about the behind-the-scenes stuff that goes on during these special circumstances. As Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald reports, workers at the Majestic manufacturing facility in Easton, PA — about two hours north of Philadelphia — stayed up all night Sunday night into Monday morning in order to make those custom No. 16 jerseys for the Marlins. They were shipped via air so they would arrive in time for the game tonight.

FanGraphs writer Eric Longenhagen notes how hard those Majestic employees work — often for low pay :

Kudos to Majestic for making a concerted effort to help the Marlins out in their time of need.