Troy Tulowitzki sounds like he wants to be traded to a contender

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By both versions of Wins Above Replacement, found at FanGraphs and at Baseball Reference, Rockies shortstop Troy Tulowitzki has been the National League’s most valuable player. Tulo’s great season, however, has been wasted as the slumping Rockies — having won only three of their previous 19 games — are now 37-51, just a game and a half ahead of the Diamondbacks for last place in the NL West.

As non-contending teams are wont to do, the Rockies will consider trading some of their expensive, established veterans to acquire younger players in order to compete in future seasons. Among the trade candidates are Tulowitzki and outfielder Carlos Gonzalez. As Mark Kiszla of the Denver Post reports, the shortstop misses the feel of competitive baseball:

“In Todd Helton, there’s someone who’s easy to look at his career here and how it played out. I have the utmost respect for Todd, but at the same time, I don’t want to be the next in line as somebody who was here for a long time and didn’t have a chance to win every single year,” said Tulowitzki, reviewing the 17 years Helton spent as the face of a franchise that never won a division title. “He played in a couple postseason games and went to one World Series. But that’s not me. I want to be somewhere where there’s a chance to be in the playoffs every single year.”

Over the past seven seasons since Tulowitzki became the Rockies’ everyday shortstop, the Rockies have made the playoffs twice: they were swept in the 2007 World Series by the Red Sox, and they were knocked out in the 2009 NLDS by the Phillies in four games. The club has won 74 or fewer games four times and appear to be well on their way to a fifth this season. One can understand Tulowitzki’s frustration.

Tulowitzki, 29, leads the league in all three triple-slash categories at .350/.441/.608. He has hit 18 home runs and driven in 47 runs, along with his usual Gold Glove-caliber defense. Tulowitzki is earning $16 million this season and is still owed $20 million in each season between 2015-19. He’ll earn $14 million in 2020 and has a $15 million 2021 club option with a $4 million buyout.

Chris Archer threw behind Jose Bautista

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Rays starter Chris Archer threw his first pitch to Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista behind the slugger’s back with one out in the first inning of Sunday afternoon’s game in Toronto. Bautista and Archer then had a staredown. Home plate umpire Jim Wolf issued warnings to both teams. Bautista ultimately flied out to right field and he appeared to have a quick word with Archer on his way back to the dugout.

Archer could have been exacting revenge — euphemistically known as “protecting his teammate” — because Jays reliever Joe Biagini hit Rays outfielder Steven Souza in the seventh inning of Saturday’s game. Souza was forced to leave the game and underwent an X-ray, which came back negative. He was held out of Sunday’s lineup. Biagini’s pitch did not appear to be intentional.

The Jays won Sunday’s contest 3-1 with no further incident. The two clubs meet again in Tampa for a three-game series starting on May 5, so we’ll see if Sunday was the last of the bad blood between them.

Bryce Harper sets April record for runs scored

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With four runs scored during Sunday’s 23-5 drubbing of the Mets, Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper set a new April record for runs scored at 32, MLB.com’s Oliver Macklin reports. The record was previously held by Larry Walker, who scored 29 runs for the Rockies in April 1997.

Harper finished 2-for-4 with a pair of walks and a solo home run (off of Mets catcher Kevin Plawecki) on the afternoon. He’s now hitting .391/.509/.772 with nine home runs and 26 RBI on the year.