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A strange replay in Oakland reveals a big hole in the replay rule

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The Oakland A’s were put in a lose-lose situation by an umpire’s call and an instant replay decision in yesterday’s game against the Blue Jays. It was a play and a call which should, if anyone is paying attention, lead to an immediate tweak to the instant replay rule.

Here’s what happened: with one out in the second inning, the Blue Jays loaded the bases against Sonny Gray and the A’s. Anthony Gose hit a grounder to A’s first baseman Nate Freiman. Freiman appeared to tag Munenori Kawasaki as he ran for second base, but umpire Vic Carapazza ruled that Freiman missed the tag and Kawasaki was safe. The play is still in motion with runners heading toward every bag. Freiman fires the ball home to catcher Steven Vogt. Vogt receives the ball and steps on home plate to get the force out of Edwin Encarnacion, who was running from third. Play ends. You can watch it all here.

Blue Jays manager John Gibbons comes out to challenge the call on the Freiman tag of Kawasaki. That is, he comes out in an effort to have his own base runner, who was called safe, called out. He does so because if Kawasaki was tagged, there was no force play in effect at home and Encarnacion needed to have been tagged, rather than forced out. After a four minute+ review, it is ruled that, yes, Kawasaki was tagged and that Encarnacion, since he was not tagged, was safe at home. A run was awarded to the Jays.

Which is totally freaking insane.

Vogt had absolutely no reason to tag Encarnancion. He was, quite reasonably, relying on the call that was just made in real time during an active play — that Kawasaki was safe and thus a force play was in effect — in doing what he did. By awarding the run the way it was rewarded, the umpires and replay officials were doing more than correcting a call. They were creating fictions. Bob Melvin played the rest of the game under protest. Luckily for the A’s and the league it ended up not mattering, as the A’s won the game regardless.

You can’t anticipate every eventuality when a new rule is put in place, but you can certainly move quickly to patch a hole. Major League Baseball needs to patch this hole immediately and acknowledge that the players can only act based on what they know at the time, so what is known at the time has to control. There needs to be an immediate tweak to the rule which goes something like this: if an umpire’s call on the field affects the subsequent decision-making of players on the same play, the call is not reviewable.

Athletics sign Santiago Casilla to two-year, $11 million deal

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 10: Santiago Casilla #46 of the San Francisco Giants throws a pitch during the 9th inning against the Miami Marlins at Marlins Park on August 10, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
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After letting rumors of the deal percolate for the last week, the Athletics officially announced their two-year, $11 million contract with right-hander Santiago Casilla on Friday (and threw a little bit of shade at the Giants, too). As previously reported, the contract includes an extra $3 million in performance bonuses.

Casilla, 36, got his major league start with Oakland back in 2004, racking up a 5.11 ERA and four saves over six seasons in the A’s bullpen. After picking up a minor league deal with the Giants in 2010, the righty flitted in and out of the closing role with varying degrees of success. Notwithstanding a slight downturn in his production rate during the 2016 season, he earned 123 saves and a 2.42 ERA during the past seven years in San Francisco. Securing another closing role might be a little tougher across the Bay, however, with a bullpen that includes fellow closers Ryan Madson, Ryan Dull and Sean Doolittle.

Keith Law: The Braves have the best farm system. Who has the worst?

PHOENIX, AZ - APRIL 06:  General manager Dave Stewart of the Arizona Diamondbacks laughs on the field before the Opening Day MLB game against the San Francisco Giants at Chase Field on April 6, 2015 in Phoenix, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
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Why is this man smiling? Man, I wouldn’t be smiling if I read what I just read.

This is the week when ESPN’s Keith Law releases his prospect and farm system rankings. He kicks off his content this week with a top-to-bottom ranking of all 30 farm systems. As a rule he limits his analysis to players who are currently in the minors and who have not yet exhausted their rookie of the year eligibility.

For the second straight year, Law ranks the Braves as the best system in baseball. Number two — making a big leap from last year’s number 13 ranking – is the New York Yankees. Dead last: the Arizona Diamondbacks, which Law says “Dave Stewart ritually disemboweled” over the past two years. That’s gotta hurt.

If you want to know the reasons and the rankings of everyone in between you’ll have to get an ESPN Insider subscription. Sorry, I know everyone hates to pay for content on the Internet, but Keith and others who do this kind of work put a lot of damn work into it and this is what pays their bills. I typically don’t like to pay for content myself, but I do pay for an ESPN Insider subscription. It’s worth it for Law’s work alone.