The All-Star Game caps are pretty different. And pretty cool.

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I realize most new uniform tweaks on special occasions are met with derision, but I really do think that the caps the All-Stars will be wearing this year are kind of fun:

 

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The press release says the caps were “[i]nspired by the 1970s era batting helmet of this year’s host club, the Minnesota Twins.” Which, yes. I wish, however, that they didn’t have the patch on the side too, as it makes a too busy mess out of the thing. The design itself is enough of a change from the norm, right? Still: pretty sweet caps for a one-off, even if I wouldn’t want to see most teams in them every day.

Just eyeballing it, though, I think the following teams would be better off with the All-Star Game designed version than with their every day caps: Nationals, Blue Jays, Rays, Diamondbacks and Rockies. A few others — Braves, Reds, Cubs, Astros and Pirates — would look good in these as occasional alternates, even if I wouldn’t want their normal caps replaced. The white panel designs are worse than the color designs, I think.

Anyway: fun.

Padres sign Jordan Lyles

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The Padres announced on Sunday that the club signed pitcher Jordan Lyles to a one-year major league contract with a club option for 2019. According to Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports, Lyles will earn $750,000 in 2018. Pitcher Travis Wood was designated for assignment to create room on the 40-man roster for Lyles.

Lyles, 27, had miserable results between the Rockies and Padres last season, compiling an aggregate 7.75 ERA with a 55/22 K/BB ratio over 69 2/3 innings. While he specifically gave up 24 earned runs in 23 innings across five starts with the Padres, it was a small sample. A full season at the pitcher-friendly Petco Park, as opposed to Colorado’s Coors Field, might help revitalize his career.

Wood, 30, went to the Padres at the non-waiver trade deadline from the Royals this past season. Overall, the lefty posted an aggregate 6.80 ERA with a 65/45 K/BB ratio in 94 innings. He’ll earn $6.5 million this season and has an $8 million mutual option with a $1 million buyout for 2019. So, the Padres are just eating $7.5 million minus the league minimum, assuming Wood latches on elsewhere.