Home plate collisions of yesteryear were the exception, not the rule

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Home plate collisions of the past few years and the new rule trying to reduce them have brought up a lot of talk about how, in trying to cut down on the collisions, Major League Baseball was taking away an essential part of the game, one which is ingrained in the minds and habits of catchers and baserunners alike.

But if that’s the case, it’s a pretty new phenomenon. As Jacob Pomrenke at The National Pastime Museum notes, home plate collisions of the Pete Rose-Ray Fosse variety, which are now thought of as a fundamental part of the game, are anything but:

For the first half of the twentieth century, most base runners—even those who skillfully practiced the art of intimidation like Ty Cobb—almost always slid feet-first into home plate. That led to some spikings, like the one described above, but few major injuries like the ones suffered by Fosse and Posey. Though there was often some contact between catcher and base runner, violent collisions at the plate were infrequent.

The rise in collisions came as a result of (a) baseball cracking down on runners going in spikes-high; and (b) a lower offensive era emerging in the 50s and 60s that were occasioned by both an increasing number of large, defense-first catchers who were good at blocking the plate and an offensive context that made one run matter a hell of a lot more than it did in previous decades.

Just a really interesting article about how the game changes organically and how it changes, often in unexpected ways, as the result of alterations to the rules.

Aaron Judge’s record strikeout streak ends at 37 games

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For the first time in a month and a half, Aaron Judge went an entire game without striking out, ending his record streak at 37 games. Judge had an RBI single and three walks in Tuesday night’s 13-4 victory over the Tigers.

Judge went 1-for-4 with a solo home run and zero strikeouts in a 9-4 loss to the Brewers on July 7. Between July 8 and August 20, Judge would strike out in all 37 games, breaking the record previously held by Adam Dunn, who struck out in the first 32 games of the 2012 season. If one counted streaks extending into multiple seasons, Dunn held the record at 36 games as he struck out in his final four games in 2011 as well.

After Tuesday’s performance, Judge is now hitting .284/.417/.594 with 37 home runs, 81 RBI, and 93 runs scored in 525 plate appearances on the season. He’s had a particularly rough second half, as he entered Tuesday with a .684 OPS since the All-Star break, a far cry from his 1.139 OPS before the break.

Video: Adrian Gonzalez doubles for his 2,000th career hit

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Dodgers first baseman Adrian Gonzalez was able to get a ground ball past Pirates first baseman Josh Bell for a double leading off the top of the sixth inning of Tuesday night’s game. He would come around to score later in the inning on a Corey Seager single, breaking a 1-1 tie.

The double gave Gonzalez 2,000 hits for his career. He is the 282nd player in baseball history and the 11th active player to reach 2,000 career hits. Gonzalez also has 300 home runs, making him one of 94 players with at least 300 dingers and 2,000 hits.

Gonzalez, who was recently activated from the disabled list, entered Tuesday’s action hitting .247/.295/.330 with one home run and 25 RBI in 201 plate appearances on the season.