“The vast majority of Hall Fame autographs are forged”

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I used to know a lot of people in the memorabilia business. A lot of them were crooked, a lot of them weren’t. But no matter who they were, they all agreed on one rule: if you didn’t see the guy signing the autograph, assume it’s a phony.

That rule seems even more useful after reading David Seideman’s article about autographs at Forbes, in which he speaks to an expert who wrote a book on autographs and believes that upwards of 90% of all Hall of Famer autographs are forged:

Fakes have many fathers. “The grim reality is that some of the greatest players treated the requests for autographs as a nuisance and had clubhouse boys and others sign them,” writes former baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent in the book’s Foreword. These “clubhouse” creations, like my Dodgers ball, appear on team-signed baseballs. Examine the “flow of the ink,” Keurajian explains. Rather than the “rapid flow found in genuine signatures,” autographs done by the same hand show a “labored appearance [where] the thickness of ink will be wide and uniform.”  In addition, a real team-signed baseball should have “ink strokes of various thickness, some thin, some fat, some in between as each person signed differently.”  Plus, the signatures usually overlap.

I have always had a complicated and fairly unpopular relationship with baseball autographs. It’s bolstered even more by stuff like this.

 

Angels hire Brad Ausmus as special assistant to the GM

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Jeff Fletcher of the Orange County Register reports that the Angels have hired former Tigers manager Brad Ausmus as a special assistant to GM Billy Eppler.

Ausmus, 48, managed the Tigers for four seasons, accruing a 314-332 (.486) record. The Tigers fired him after the 2017 season and hired former Twins manager Ron Gardenhire in his place.

Ausmus will assist with scouting and evaluations of players in the Angels’ system, amateurs, and players in other organizations.