Baseball is dying, you guys

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As we observed last week, it’s not enough to note that the World Cup is getting great ratings and is generating a lot of passion and excitement. Or that, generally, soccer continues to grow in the United States. We must turn it into a zero-sum game and observe all of this in the context of baseball’s long-discussed demise (note: the discussion began in the 19th century).

The latest to provide a eulogy — or, technically speaking, a terminal diagnosis: Frank Fitzpatrick of the Philly Inquirer:

Baseball’s been a lifelong companion. But the old game is looking a little frail, and I worry about its future.

I can’t easily express any specific concerns. The worries my gut sense haven’t yet reached my head.

Something doesn’t feel right.

It’s like that moment we first noticed our parents’ mortality. Maybe it was nothing more than an incongruous comment, a faraway look in their eyes, or an uncertain step, but whatever it was, we instinctively knew nothing would ever be the same again.

Of course, all of that is leadup to a discussion of the World Cup. Which while it is wrongheaded and insulting about baseball, manages to insult the World Cup as well by not discussing it on its own terms as opposed to in terms of baseball’s alleged demise.

Then again, the author refers to a game involving “the Florida Marlins” from just last week, so maybe we’re not dealing with a guy who knows a whole hell of a lot about anything.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.