Who could’ve predicted Tim Lincecum’s no-hitter? Maybe an astrologer

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Wendy Thurm — who was at the Giants-Padres game as a fan yesterday and then ended up filing some stories about Tim Lincecum’s no-hitter last night — tweeted out this overnight. It’s from Leah Garchik at SFgate.com:

The spring-summer 2014 edition of “The Ultimate Sports Guide” includes astrologer Andrea Mallis’ analysis of Tim Lincecum, born June 15, 1984: “This season heralds Tim’s Saturn Return, an auspicious planetary cycle of new beginnings occurring around age 29 or 30.” Lincecum “is aligning with the forces of the universe, as the Saturn Return guides him to prioritize objectives. … We move forward as the planets do, as transformation morphs into Lincecum 2.0, getting back on track as the stars align. A repurposed Gemini Twins blend of inner peace and outward persistence makes this a Saturn Return season to remember.”

I don’t feel like Lincecum has ever lacked “inner peace,” but what do I know? I’s nice to see that he’s returning to Saturn, however.

[Shakes head, puts on his John McClane from “Die Hard” voice]: California.

Aaron Judge set a new postseason strikeout record

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For a few days, it looked like Aaron Judge was finally hitting his stride in the postseason. He was still striking out at a regular clip, piling more and more strikeouts atop the 16 he racked up in the Division Series, but he was mashing, too. He engineered a three-run homer during Game 3 of the Championship Series, followed by another blast and game-tying double in Game 4. His one-out double helped pad a five-run lead in Game 5, while his 425-footer off of Brad Peacock barely made a dent during a 7-1 loss in Game 6. And then Lance McCullers‘ curveball found and fooled him, as it did five of the 14 batters it met in Game 7:

The strikeout was Judge’s first of the evening and 27th since the start of the playoffs. No other major league batter has racked up that many strikeouts in a single postseason, though Alfonso Soriano’s 26-strikeout record in 2003 comes the closest. Within that record, Judge also collected three golden sombreros (four strikeouts in a single game), narrowly avoiding the dreaded platinum sombrero (five strikeouts in a single game).

It’s an unfortunate footnote to a spectacular year for the rookie outfielder, who decimated the competition with 52 home runs and 8.2 fWAR during the regular season and was a pivotal part of the Yankees’ playoff run. Thankfully, the image of McCullers’ curveball darting just under Judge’s bat won’t be the image that sticks with us for years to come. Instead, it’ll look something like this: