Clayton Kershaw

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Dodgers 2, Royals 0: Clayton Kershaw is so damn inconsistent. Last time: no-hitter. This time? He gave up several hits. Last time: full game. This time? Only eight innings. You think you’re fooling us by continuing to not give up any runs, Clayton, but we can tell that you’re falling off.

Phillies 7, Marlins 4: Marlon Byrd hit a two-run homer and the Phillies snapped a three-game losing streak, but the highlight here was the standing ovation Tony Gwynn, Jr. got in his first at bat following his father’s death. Good on ya, Philly fans.

Nationals 4, Brewers 2: A sixteen inning affair, with Ryan Zimmerman’s two-run homer in the top of that inning saving us (or depriving us, depending on your point of view) from seeing Adam LaRoche and/or Lyle Overbay pitching. The Brewers threatened many times in extra innings, but Nats relievers ended up throwing 10 scoreless innings.

Pirates 6, Rays 5: Pittsburgh moves above .500 for only the second time this year, the last time being mid April. Since May 6 they have baseball’s best record. Which, yes, doesn’t matter unless everyone else started May 6 (note: they did not), but it’s still worth noting.

Mets 10, Athletics 1: Billed as a pitchers duel — Kazmir vs. Colon — only one of them showed up with his sword. The Mets rocked Scott Kazmir for seven runs on eight hits in three innings. Colon, on the other hand, continued his fine season,, allowing one run over eight innings. He even got a hit for the second game in a row. Mets hitters smacked four homers.

Blue Jays 7, Yankees 6: The Jays had a 6-0 lead entering the sixth, the Yankees rallied in the sixth and seventh to tie it and then a walkoff error by the Yankees gaves this one to the Jays. It happened when Jose Reyes hit a leadoff double in the ninth inning and then, when Melky Cabrera tried to bunt him over to third, Yankees third baseman Yangervis Solarte threw the ball away. Miss U A-Rod.

White Sox 4, Orioles 2: Jose Quintana allowed one run in seven innings and Gordon Beckham homered as Chicago ended a five-game losing streak. They had lost nine of 11 overall and eight straight on the road before this.

Cubs 7, Reds 3: Jake Arrieta was perfect through six. He ran out of gas in the seventh, giving up two runs on three hits, but he had enough of a cushion where it didn’t matter. He’s 3-0 with a 1.14 ERA in five June starts.

Tigers 8, Rangers 2: Ian Kinsler returned to Texas and homered against his former mates. Unlike what we said with Zack Greinke yesterday, we have a pretty good idea that they are, indeed, no longer mates if they ever were as Kinsler gave a little wave to them as he trotted the bases, which probably was not well received. In other news, glad you’re still not taking that trade personally, Ian.

Rockies 10, Cardinals 5: Justin Morneau was 3 for 5 with a homer and six driven in. Shelby Miller was ineffective and then incapacitated due to back tightness. The Rockies snapped a seven-game slide. Morneau is hitting .304/.340/.522 with 13 homers and 57 RBI on the year. Not bad for a guy who looked to be close to done a year or two ago.

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk’s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $30,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Wednesday night’s MLB games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $5,000. Starts at 7:05pm ET on WednesdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Diamondbacks 9, Indians 8: Another long game, this one 14 innings. And, time-wise, it was the longest in the history of Chase Field: five hours and 22 minutes. Miguel Montero said, though, that due to walks and stranded runners and slow play, it felt longer:

“It felt like seven hours. The game was slow anyway. Through seven it was like a three-hour game already. We had to play the extra innings and that made it longer.”

My condolences to anyone who had to watch this one.

Braves 3, Astros 2: The Uptons both homered. It was the fourth time they have homered in the same game, tying the record for brothers doing so held by Jeremy and Jason Giambi and Vladimir and Wilton Guerrero. Jose Canseco is on his way to the league office to petition for a rule change that allows “Bash Brothers” to count so as to help preserve his legacy.

Padres 7, Giants 2: San Diego has won five of seven. They really got to Tim Hudson, who has suddenly lost the thread. He ha allowed a combined 13 runs over his last two starts after giving up just 19 runs over his first 13.

Angels 8, Twins 6: Staked to a 5-0 lead in the first, C.J. Wilson surrendered five to the Twins in the second. But then Mike Trout put the Halos back in the lead in the bottom of the second with a two-run homer, and the rest was just details.

Mariners 8, Red Sox 2: Kyle Seager had an RBI double in the first inning and hit a three-run homer in the fifth, helping the Mariners win their fifth straight. Boston has lost five of six and has given up 20 runs to the M’s in two games. Just some ugly times for the defending champs.

Must-Click Link: The Turbulent Final Year of Yordano Ventura’s Life

KANSAS CITY, MO - OCTOBER 23:  Yordano Ventura #30 of the Kansas City Royals reacts in the sixth inning while taking on the Toronto Blue Jays in game six of the 2015 MLB American League Championship Series at Kauffman Stadium on October 23, 2015 in Kansas City, Missouri.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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The Kansas City Star has covered the death of Yordano Ventura and its aftermath in a thorough, thoughtful, respectful and admirable fashion and it has all been compelling to read, even if it’s often been difficult to read. Their latest story may be the most difficult, though it is nonetheless essential.

It covers the final year of Ventura’s life which, sadly, was tumultuous. He had become estranged from his family. He was married to a woman who, at the time of the ceremony, was still married to her first husband and whose family, allegedly, later made threats against Ventura that we’re only now learning about. This includes allegations of armed men accosting Ventura at his home near the Royals spring training facility a year ago. An incident which led to him missing time due to “flulike symptoms,” but which, in reality, caused him considerable mental distress. He was again threatened, it is claimed, in Kansas City during the season. There is also an allegation that Ventura attempted suicide via an overdose of Benadryl, though that is disputed.

Beyond that, there is an arc to the end of Ventura’s life which sounds unfortunately familiar. It’s a story of a young man whose life changed dramatically in a very, very short period of time and who struggled at times to process the changes. Were it not for a fateful drive on a dark and winding road one night in late January, they all could’ve been things that, as his career matured, he could look back on as learning experiences. Now that he’s gone, however, they form the final, tragic chapter.

Report: Royals and Eric Hosmer have discussed a long-term contract extension

SAN DIEGO, CA - JULY 12:  Eric Hosmer #35 of the Kansas City Royals and the American League rounds the bases after hitting a home run against the National League in the 2nd inning of the 87th Annual MLB All-Star Game at PETCO Park on July 12, 2016 in San Diego, California.  (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports reports that the Royals and first baseman Eric Hosmer have discussed a long-term contract extension. However, Hosmer also indicated that he will head into free agency if a deal is not consummated by Opening Day.

Hosmer, 27, avoided arbitration with the Royals last month, agreeing to a $12.25 million salary for the 2017 season. He is one of four key Royals players who can become a free agent after the season along with Mike Moustakas, Alcides Escobar, and Lorenzo Cain. If Hosmer does reach free agency, he would arguably be the top free agent first baseman.

Hosmer finished the past season hitting .266/.328/.433 with 25 home runs and 104 RBI while making his first All-Star team.