Quote of the Day: Kyle Lohse on the Diamondbacks’ “tough guy stuff”

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We wrote last night about the ridiculously and stupidly macho baloney from Kirk Gibson and the Diamondabcks. In short: they retaliated for what was almost certainly an accidental beaning — or, maybe, some old hard feelings over past encounters with the Brewers — by intentionally plunking Ryan Braun. The dumbest part was, even if the retaliation was justified, it came at an awful time, because plunking Braun loaded the bases for the Brewers’ hottest hitter, Jonathan Lucroy, who immediately hit a grand slam. In a game that was close and still winnable for the Brewers.

After the game, Brewers starter Kyle Lohse had this to say about the Dbacks’ strategy:

“You know what? They won tough-guy points today. But I don’t know where the stats are for those. You’re going to play tough-guy stuff? Go ahead. We’re winning games.”

That sort of instant karma is pretty damn satisfying. But really, given that the Dbacks’ very own GM is on record talking about how it’s a team value and strategy to hit opposing batters, I would hope that in addition to the instant karma, someone at MLB — all of whom I’m pretty sure have Tony La Russa’s telephone number — do something about it. Because there’s no place for this sort of garbage in the game.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.