ESPN Dallas’ Richard Durrett dies suddenly at age 38

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This is horrible news. Richard Durrett, an ESPNDallas.com writer who covered the Rangers for the past several years — and who served as a Dallas Morning News reporter several years before that — died yesterday. He was only 38-years-old. While it hasn’t been officially announced, many people are saying he was killed by a brain aneurysm.

ESPN and the Rangers both issued statements on his passing, which can be read here.

Durett was a truly nice guy in a line of work that doesn’t necessarily require or reward being a nice guy. I met him on a couple of occasions and he was the polar opposite of the sportswriter stereotype. He wasn’t grumpy or cynical. He was funny, but his humor was not the dark or gallows humor you often hear from those who inhabit press boxes. When I, as a clueless newbie, showed up in Surprise, Arizona for spring training a couple of years ago, Durrett was kind and accommodating and showed me around the place to help me get my bearings. That doesn’t happen too often. When you’re a tourist in the press box, you’re usually on your own.

In 2011, after Rangers fan Shannon Stone fell to his death at the ballpark while trying to reach a ball for his son, Durrett wrote this piece in response, thinking about fathers and sons. And, specifically, his own son who was three at the time and is only six now. Give it a read and remember what’s important in life.

Thirty-eight is far too young. Take some time for a nice thought or a prayer for his family who will now have to spend way too much time without him than any family should. And make sure you do whatever you can do to live your life in the present, making sure those who you love know that you love them. Life isn’t fair. Death is less fair than that. All we can do is make the most of it while we can.

Mark Buehrle had “definitely no more than three” beers before saving Game 3 of the ’05 World Series

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David Ortiz is not the only Sox player who will see his number retired this week. In Chicago, retired White Sox starter Mark Buehrle will have his 56 retired as well.

He definitely earned it. He won 161 games in 12 seasons with the White Sox, defining what it meant to be a workhorse starter in the 21st century, tossing 200+ innings in every full season he pitched on the South Side. And, of course, he helped lead the White Sox to a World Series victory in 2005, starting the Chisox’ Game 2 victory, tossing seven innings.

He also got a save in that series. That came in Game 3, which went 14 innings, thus necessitating Buehrle’s services after Ozzie Guillen went through eight other pitchers. Buehrle only had to toss three pitches in a third of an inning to get that save, but he got it.

And, as he writes in The Players’ Tribune today, he did it with a slight handicap:

The thing a lot of people talk about with that one is this rumor that I drank a few beers before I got the save in our Game 3 victory.

There’s been some stuff that’s come out on that topic, but I feel like you all should really hear it straight from the horse’s mouth. So, here goes….

In short: Yeah, sure, O.K. fine, so I had a few. I can admit to that.

But you gotta let me explain.

He explains that he didn’t think he’d be pitching that night, which was a fair guess at the time. And that he got his drinking done pretty early, checking in with the coaches a lot. So, fine. But how many beers did he have?

And it was just like one or two beers . . .

. . . It was only like three beers….

Max.

Definitely no more than three, though.

I swear.

Mmhmm.

All of this, of course, makes one think about the whole Chicken and Beer incident in Boston. And how that became so overblown that it cost people their jobs and stuff. The only difference there is that (a) the guys drinking the beer were in no way coming into any games; and (b) the Red Sox lost. Change (b) and Josh Beckett and company become legends.

Anyway, congratulations on your honor, Mark. You earned it. Have a beer on us.

Red Sox claim Doug Fister off waivers

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SB Nation’s Chris Cotillo reports that the Red Sox claimed Doug Fister off release waivers from the Angels.

Fister, 33, opted out of his contract with the Angels the other day after posting allowing seven runs on 16 hits with five walks and 10 strikeouts in 15.2 innings at Triple-A Salt Lake City. He was presumably told that he would not be making it to the big club any time soon. With Boston’s pitching injuries, specifically to Eduardo Rodriguez, he may have a better shot of pitching in the majors for the Red Sox.