Red Sox designate Grady Sizemore for assignment, call up prospect Garin Cecchini

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Grady Sizemore’s feel good story of a comeback in Boston is over, as the Red Sox have designated the outfielder for assignment to make room on the roster for third base prospect Garin Cecchini’s call-up.

Sizemore got off to an impressive start after missing all of 2012 and 2013 with injuries, but then hit just .187 with zero homers and a .530 OPS over a 43-game stretch from April 15 to June 15. Overall he hit .216 with two homers and a 41/19 K/BB ratio in 52 games, producing a measly .612 OPS that ranks 83rd out of 93 outfielders with at least 150 plate appearances.

Sizemore can surely find another team willing to take a flier on him via a minor-league deal, but sadly it’s looking likely that all the injuries and missed time have the three-time All-Star seeming washed up at age 31.

Cecchini briefly made his MLB debut for the Red Sox on June 1 before heading back to Triple-A, where he’s hit .263 with two homers and a .673 OPS in 62 games as a 23-year-old. That’s unimpressive production, but Cecchini was 74th on Baseball America’s list of prospects heading into the season. He’s played exclusively third base in the minors and the Red Sox have Xander Bogaerts there after re-signing Stephen Drew to play shortstop, so it’s unclear whether Cecchini is in their plans for more than another brief stint.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.