Troy Tulowitzki exits game with right toe injury; X-rays come back negative

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The Rockies are already without Carlos Gonzalez, Michael Cuddyer, and Nolan Arenado in their lineup, but now they might have to do without their star shortstop for a little while too, as Troy Tulowitzki was forced to exit last night’s game against the Giants with a right toe injury.

Tulowitzki came up hobbling as he was running up the first base line on a leadoff single in the top of the ninth inning. According to Thomas Harding of MLB.com, X-rays came back negative on the third metatarsal on his right foot and Rockies manager Walt Weiss said after the game that the early diagnosis is a “sprained toe.” It’s unclear how long he’ll be sidelined.

Tulowitzki has been the game’s best player so far this season, batting .356/.449/.662 with 17 home runs and 43 RBI over over 64 games while playing quality defense at shortstop. It would be a shame to see another injury get in the way of him playing a full season. The 29-year-old hasn’t played more than 143 games in a season since 2009.

Derek Jeter wants to get rid of the Marlins’ home run sculpture

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Derek Jeter, part-owner of the Marlins, met with Miami-Dade County mayor Carlos Gimenez on Tuesday afternoon at Marlins Park, Douglas Hanks of the Miami Herald reports. They discussed potentially removing the home run sculpture from the ballpark, something that has been on Jeter’s to-do list since he took over.

Gimenez said of the sculpture, “I just don’t think they’re all that crazy about it. I’m not a fan. We’re looking at it. … We’ll see if anything can be done.”

According to Hanks, the sculpture is public property because it was purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings. Michael Spring, the cultural chief for Miami-Dade who was present with Jeter and Gimenez on Tuesday, had previously said that the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed” because it was designed “specifically” for Marlins Park. On Tuesday, Spring said, “Anything is possible. But it is pretty complicated. And I wanted the mayor and the Marlins to understand how complicated it really was. We got a good look at it today, and they saw how big it was. There’s hydraulics, there’s plumbing, there’s electricity.”

With Jeter having traded Giancarlo Stanton, Marcell Ozuna, and Dee Gordon this offseason, the home run sculpture is arguably one of the last remaining interesting things about the Marlins in 2018. Naturally, he wants to get rid of it.