Ryan Zimmerman will move back to third base when Bryce Harper gets healthy

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Ryan Zimmerman has been playing left field for the Nationals since coming off the disabled list last week, but manager Matt Williams made it clear that he’ll return to third base once Bryce Harper is ready to come off the disabled list himself.

Here’s what Williams told Adam Kilgore of the Washington Post:

We got a pretty good outfielder hopefully coming back really soon. The perfect world is, Zim would go back to third, where he’s played a long time and won a Gold Glove. And when Harp’s ready, Harp will play left. That’s the plan.

Of course, “coming back really soon” in Harper’s case means early July, so it’ll be several more weeks still until it’s an actual issue for the Nationals. Zimmerman moving back to third base would also mean Anthony Rendon moving back to second base and Danny Espinosa going to the bench.

However, it may not be quite that simple because, as Kilgore writes, Zimmerman has seemed very happy with his move to the outfield and has hinted that there’s some reason to doubt if his chronic shoulder problems can still handle third base regularly. Something tells me this whole thing won’t go exactly as Williams’ “plan” suggests.

Joe Maddon: “I have a defensive foot fetish.”

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The Cubs’ defense — or lack thereof this year — has been a topic of conversation as it could help explain why the team hasn’t played at the elite level it played at last year.

Manager Joe Maddon tried to go into detail about that but ended up channeling his inner Rex Ryan. Via CSN Chicago’s Patrick Mooney.

Well then.

The Nationals have scored 62 runs during four Joe Ross starts

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If, in the future, Joe Ross ever complains about a lack of run support, point to his first four starts of the 2017 season.

Ross started on April 19 in Atlanta against the Braves, on April 25 in Colorado against the Rockies, on April 30 at home against the Mets, and on May 23 at home against the Mariners. In those games, the Nats’ offense scored 14, 15, 23, and 10 runs respectively for a total of 62 runs, or an average of 15.5 per start. Ross was the pitcher of record for seven, eight, 10, and 10 runs for a total of 35 runs (8.75 runs per start), which would still make him the major league leader in run support by that restrictive standard.

Among qualified starters — Ross did not qualify — entering Tuesday’s action, the Rockies’ Antonio Senzatela led the way according to ESPN, averaging 7.11 runs of support in nine starts. The Rockies scored double-digit runs in only three of those starts, oddly enough.

Per the Nationals, the 62 runs of support for Ross is a major league record in a pitcher’s first four starts of a season.