Carlos Rodon

Rick Hahn positive on Scott Boras client Carlos Rodon signing with White Sox

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While some outsiders have concerns about Carlos Rodon’s signability given he’s represented by Scott Boras, the White Sox don’t sound too worried.

Echoing amateur scouting director Doug Laumann’s confidence the White Sox will sign Rodon, the team’s first top-5 draft pick since 1990, general manager Rick Hahn said Monday he is upbeat about the situation.

Saying they wanted the best player on the board no matter what, the White Sox drafted the top collegiate pitcher with the No. 3 overall pick on Thursday despite the presence of Boras. Even though Boras has gained a reputation for driving a hard bargain on his clients’ behalf, Hahn said Monday — in his first public statement since Rodon was drafted — he’s keeping positive thoughts.

“I tend to be an optimistic guy,” Hahn said. “I never anticipate problems. Look, in reality, we have a history with Scott, a positive history with Scott. He had Joe Crede, he’s got (Dayan) Viciedo. We had Andruw Jones here. A fair amount of this concern, or discussion on how this could be difficult, I think is unnecessary and really not significant to us determining what’s going to happen here.”

[MORE: Konerko believes the Tigers are the team to beat]

There’s some thought among baseball analysts that Rodon would ask for a signing bonus similar to what the No. 1 pick is expected to receive. Though top pick Brady Aiken signed with the Houston Astros for $6.5 million, the suggested slot for the No. 1 was roughly $7.9 million.

The suggested slot amount for the third pick is $5.72 million and Rodon could try and command somewhere in between those two amounts. That might hurt the White Sox chances of signing other players as, even though they have a franchise-record $9.5 million bonus pool, Rodon could eat a significant chunk of that money.

One way the White Sox can offset a larger bonus for Rodon, and how they have operated in the past, is to pick players in earlier rounds than they may have been projected to be selected in exchange for below-slot deals.

Last year, the White Sox drafted senior pitchers Nick Blount and Brad Goldberg in the ninth and 10 th rounds and signed them for $10,000 each, far below their slotted values.

This year, the White Sox drafted similar-type players in the sixth (OF Louie Lechich) and eighth (SS John Ziznewski) rounds. While neither has officially signed, their slotted signing bonuses are $272,000 and $162,000.

[WATCH: Hahn discusses three top picks, draft]

“We’re gonna make sure we put ourselves in position to sign as many players as we’re capable of signing,” Hahn said. “We did not take any of these players without the intent of being able to sign them.

“The way the pool works, what you pay one player does influence what you can pay another. We knew going in what our plan was. We hope it plays out.”

One addition the White Sox can include in their package to Rodon — though it’s not a guarantee — is potentially a faster path to the majors. The White Sox could hypothetically tell Rodon, who is perceived to be nearly major league ready, they would bring him to Chicago this season if he signs.

The White Sox did that with Chris Sale after they took him No. 13 in 2010. They don’t want to pressure Rodon and put Sale’s meteoric timeline on him but they won’t rule out the path, either.

“As we enter into this we intend to be aggressive, be fair and make an offer that, hopefully, convinces him it’s time to begin his professional career,” Hahn said.

Hisashi Iwakuma’s 2017 option vests, but salary still undetermined

OAKLAND, CA - AUGUST 13: Hisashi Iwakuma #18 of the Seattle Mariners pitches against the Oakland Athletics in the bottom of the third inning at the Oakland Coliseum on August 13, 2016 in Oakland, California. (Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)
Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images
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With last Wednesday’s start against the Yankees, Mariners hurler Hisashi Iwakuma pushed his 2016 innings total up to 2016. That clears the 162-inning hurdle for his 2017 option to vest at $14 million. However, as Steve Adams of MLB Trade Rumors reports, the language in Iwakuma’s contract also stipulates that the right-hander finish the season without suffering a specific injury.

Iwakuma, 35, was in agreement with the Dodgers on a three-year contract back in December but failed the physical, which nullified the deal. He ended up signing with the Mariners on a one-year, $12 million deal with a full no-trade clause and club options for 2017 and ’18 that vest at specific inning thresholds (162 each or 324 for both seasons).

This season, Iwakuma has stayed healthy, making 26 starts to the tune of a 14-9 record, a 3.81 ERA and a 118/36 K/BB ratio in 163 innings.

Ichiro Suzuki passes Wade Boggs for 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list

MIAMI, FL - AUGUST 28: Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins grounds out during the 2nd inning against the San Diego Padres at Marlins Park on August 28, 2016 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Eric Espada/Getty Images)
Eric Espada/Getty Images
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Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki deposited a single to left-center field in the fourth inning of Monday night’s game against the Mets, then added a double to center field in the eighth. Those mark hits No. 3,010 and 3,011 for Suzuki in his major league career, tying and then moving past Wade Boggs for sole possession of 27th on baseball’s all-time hits list.

Suzuki would come around to score on a double by Xavier Scruggs to break a scoreless tie in the eighth.

Here’s the video of Ichiro’s first hit.

By the end of the season, Suzuki will have presumably moved ahead of Rafael Palmeiro (26th; 3,020) and Lou Brock (25th; 3,023).

Suzuki was 2-for-4 after the double. With baseball’s fifth month nearly complete, the 42-year-old is currently batting .298/.371/.373.