Lonnie Chisenhall’s brilliance could spell the end of Jason Giambi’s career

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For every good there’s a bad. For every yin a yang. The yang to Lonnie Chisenhall’s spectacular .385/.429/.615 yin is the roster crunch it will likely occasion for the Indians. And the odd-man out is probably going to be Jason Giambi.

Anthony Castrovince of MLB.com looks at the issue today, and he sees it pretty realistically: once Nick Swisher returns from the disabled list Terry Francona will have to figure out where to play him, Chisenhall, Carlos Santana, Mike Aviles and Giambi. If you assume Chisenhall has earned the right to stick at third base, that Santana’s recent concussion and the presence of two other catchers is going to limit his time behind the plate and that the DH slot is going to feature a rotation of Santana, Swisher and whoever needs some rest, it’s going to be really hard to justify carrying Giambi, who is basically a platoon DH now.

Some may say too many bats is a good problem to have — and it’s way better than the alternative, no question — but such a state of affairs may very well end the career of one of the best and most interesting hitters of the past 20 years.

If that makes you sad, do realize that this state of affairs also gave Castrovince the opportunity to refer to Nick Swisher as “the $56 million bro,” which may be the nickname of the year.

Clayton Kershaw struggles with control, walks six Marlins

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Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw entered Wednesday night’s start against the Marlins without having issued a walk in his previous three starts. In fact, his last walk came on April 3 when he issued a free pass to Paul Goldschmidt with the bases empty and two outs in the bottom of the first inning. All told, Kershaw was on a streak of 26 walk-less innings before he took the mound at home to take on the Marlins.

Kershaw started off Wednesday in character, striking out the side in the first inning. He issued a walk in a tough second inning, but escaped without allowing a run. Kershaw walked two more in the third and again danced out of danger. In the fourth, Kershaw walked Lewis Brinson to load the bases with no outs and — you guessed it — didn’t end up allowing a run. His errant control finally came back to bite him in the fifth when Kershaw issued back-to-back two-out walks, then served up a three-run home run to Miguel Rojas down the left field line. His night was done when he completed the inning. Five innings, three runs, five hits, six walks, seven strikeouts, 112 pitches.

The six walks Kershaw issued over five innings marked his first six-walk outing since April 7, 2010 when he issued six free passes to the Pirates in 4 2/3 innings. The only other time he walked as many was on August 3, 2009 against the Brewers in a four-plus inning outing. Kershaw hasn’t even walked five batters in an outing recently — the last time was September 23, 2012 against the Reds.