Max Scherzer Getty

Max Scherzer took out an insurance policy after rejecting contract extension from Tigers


You might remember that Tigers right-hander and 2013 AL Cy Young Award winner Max Scherzer rejected a six-year, $144 million contract extension from the Tigers in the spring. It was a calculated risk for a pitcher who could hit it big on the free agent market this winter. However, he has a Plan B if something goes terribly awry in the coming months.

Tom Verducci of has the story:

Scherzer revealed to that he took out an insurance policy that covers lost potential earnings if he is injured prior to hitting the free agent market this winter.

“This takes the injury risk out of it,” said Scherzer, who did not specify if the policy covered all or most of the $144 million.

It’s not like Scherzer will be hard-up for cash if hurts his arm tomorrow and never plays again. Including this year’s $15.525 million salary, he has made almost $30 million during his career. Still, it’s a smart and logical move for him. This kind of thing is probably more common than we realize, though Scherzer’s situation obviously commands more attention since he could fetch a $200 million deal this winter if all goes according to plan for him and his agent Scott Boras.

SportsDash: Jeff Passan explains why Scherzer’s arm is so expensive

Video: Ichiro Suzuki pitches an inning for the Marlins

Ichiro Suzuki
AP Photo
1 Comment

Marlins outfielder Ichiro Suzuki was given an opportunity to play a new position in Sunday’s series finale against the Phillies. After the Phillies rallied to take a 6-2 lead in the seventh, the Marlins let Suzuki take the hill in the eighth. And, in news that surprises no one, he was impressive.

Though Suzuki gave up a run on two hits, he flashed a fastball that hit the mid-80’s and a breaking ball with some bite.

Suzuki, who turns 42 years old later this month, is 65 hits of 3,000 in his major league career. The Marlins are interested in bringing him back in 2016.

Miguel Cabrera, Dee Gordon win AL and NL batting titles, respectively

Miguel Cabrera
AP Photo

Tigers first baseman Miguel Cabrera didn’t play in the Tigers’ season finale against the White Sox, but he has officially clinched the AL batting title with a .338 average following Sunday’s action. It’s Cabrera’s fourth batting title in his last five seasons.

Marlins second baseman Dee Gordon entered Sunday’s season finale with a bit more pressure. He was in a tight race with Nationals outfielder Bryce Harper for the NL batting title, trailing only by rounding to the fourth place, .3307 to .3306. Gordon went 3-for-4 in a loss to the Phillies while Harper went 1-for-4 in a loss to the Mets. As a result, Gordon officially won the NL batting title with a .330 average. It’s the first batting title of Gordon’s brief career. Hanley Ramirez was the Marlins’ last batting champion, doing so in 2009.