Happy 40th Birthday Ten Cent Beer Night!

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I memorialize this every year because I am a sucker for well-intentioned ideas that turn into utter disasters and the recognition that, oftentimes, we simply can’t have nice things. And really, what is better intentioned and what is a nicer thing than giving people fatigued by Watergate and economic stagnation a night of cheap beer?

But we note it again today, the 40th anniversary of Ten Cent Beer Night in Cleveland. The Indians’ promotion that gave unhappy people unlimited quantities of nearly-free alcohol which, amazingly, turned into utter chaos. Paul Jackson’s 2008 story remains the gold standard on the topic, giving us the background of how it went down and why Cleveland in 1974 was the perfect time and place for that to turn into the mess it became.

As I noted last year, I am less shocked by the riot itself than I am about the conditions which led up to it. The accepted notion that, heck, people are going to get drunk and rowdy at the ballpark in large numbers and that people throwing bottles onto the field — before the riot started, mind you — was just the cost of doing business to get, like, half a million people to come see your games over the course of the season. Now the least bit of bad fan behavior is newsworthy. And the notion that you have to accept such ridiculousness in order to get a small number of people through the turnstiles is positively foreign.

Maybe the beer is too expensive today. Maybe there are too many distractions and family-friendly promotions that relegate the game to an afterthought at times. I often think that’s the case anyway. But I’d willingly take today’s excesses over those of the bad old days of the 1970s.

The Mariners turned an odd triple play with the help of Evan Gattis

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Astros DH Evan Gattis unwittingly helped the Mariners complete a triple play in the fourth inning of Thursday afternoon’s game at Safeco Field. The Astros put runners on first and second on consecutive singles by Jose Altuve and Carlos Correa, bringing Gattis to the plate.

Gattis check-swung at a first-pitch curve from Marco Gonzales, hitting a grounder to third base. Kyle Seager stepped on the third base bag and then threw to second base for the second out. There was not nearly enough time for Robinson Cano to get the throw to first base to complete a triple play. Gattis ostensibly lost track of the number of outs in the inning, so he just circled back to the dugout and the Mariners completed their triple play since Gattis went out of the baseline.

That’s the first triple play of the 2018 season. It’s the Mariners’ first triple play since July 26, 2015 against the Blue Jays.