Tim Lincecum

Billy Hamilton causes Tim Lincecum to lose focus, game

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Only three Giants pitchers have an ERA over 4.00. One of them is not like the others.

Yusmeiro Petit’s ERA is 4.60, but he’s already saved the Giants’ bacon multiple times. David Huff has the worst ERA on the team at 6.30, but there’s a reason why the Yankees sold him to the Giants for a relative pittance – especially compared to what they’re paying Tim Lincecum.

[RELATED: Instant Replay: Lincecum roughed up by Reds, Giants lose 8-3]

Lincecum’s ERA is 5.01 after allowing eight earned runs over 4.1 innings in Tuesday’s 8-3 loss to the Reds. That’s not exactly what the Giants were hoping for when they gave him $35 million over two seasons.

“Just a tough day for Timmy. He made some mistakes early. He looked like he got in a pretty good zone there. In the fifth he got the ball up again,” Bruce Bochy told reporters.

“I thought Timmy was going to regroup and get us somewhat deeper in the game.”

That’s the Lincecum the Giants paid for, an unpredictable starter whose best trait at this stage of his career is probably durability.

His stuff isn’t what it once was, but that’s not his biggest problem. Command isn’t even the greatest concern, even though he’s back to walking batters at a high rate.

Lincecum can handle the pressure of postseason play. He can still strike hitters out. Yet he still hasn’t developed any sort of coping mechanism to keep regular season innings from spiraling out of control when something gets under his skin.

Tuesday’s game was an excellent example. It’s not a coincidence that he split those eight runs equally among the first and fifth innings, the innings Billy Hamilton led off and reached base.

“Hamilton’s a big part of their offense, and him getting on two out of three times against me kind of flustered me on timing to the plate. I let it get to me in those two big innings,” Lincecum said.

A pitcher with Lincecum’s credentials should be able to shake off obstacles. Allowing a hit to the fastest man in baseball or getting too sweaty shouldn’t mean he automatically loses a feel for his mechanics or forgets to hold base runners.

He’ll probably never again be the Cy Young dynamo that made each fifth day a holiday in San Francisco, but the Giants believe he’s better than what he’s shown.

“Sure, he’s walked some guys, but if you look at his recent work it’s been pretty good. Look at what our record is with him pitching,” Bochy said.

“This is a guy that set the bar extremely high. He’s a little different pitcher now, but he’s shown what he can do. I hope after today he gets back on that run that he had in more recent starts before tonight.”

The Giants’ record with Lincecum is 8-4 after Tuesday’s loss, and his ERA was under 3.00 in May. So they feel like there’s time to let him figure things out, especially considering Tim Hudson’s dominance, the reemergence of Ryan Vogelsong, and the team’s win-loss record.

Besides the lack of focus, the maddening thing for everyone involved is that Lincecum has no idea who he is.

He came out of Spring Training with plans to pitch to contact. Then he gave up 36 hits and six home runs in April while only walking six in 25.2 innings. He averaged just over five innings per start that month with an ERA of 5.96.

In May he walked 22 in 34.2 innings, but allowed far fewer runs, hits and home runs.

Things seemed to be looking up. Then Hamilton gets in his head and he finds it hard to do anything besides dwell on the negative.

That’s never a good idea in a sport where failure is a constant, even for the best players.

“It’s kind of hard not to think about the bad stuff that goes on and stuff that you’ve let happen and what you need to do to change that,” said Lincecum.

“I think a lot of people think there’s a big space between being good and not being good. In this game it’s a small factor of space to make up. I’ve just got to look for that.”

Ichiro was happy to see Pete Rose get defensive about his hits record

SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA - JUNE 14:  Ichiro Suzuki #51 of the Miami Marlins warms-up during batting practice before a baseball game against the San Diego Padres at PETCO Park on June 14, 2016 in San Diego, California.   (Photo by Denis Poroy/Getty Images)
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You’ll recall the little controversy last month when Ichiro Suzuki passed Pete Rose’s hit total. Specifically, when Ichiro’s Japanese and American hit total reached Rose’s American total of 4,256 and a lot of people talked about Ichiro being the new “Hit King.” You’ll also recall that Rose himself got snippy about it, wondering if people would now think of him as “the Hit Queen,” which he took to be disrespect.

There’s a profile of Ichiro over at ESPN the Magazine and reporter Marly Rivera asked Ichiro about that. Ichiro’s comments were interesting and quite insightful about how ego and public perception work in the United States:

I was actually happy to see the Hit King get defensive. I kind of felt I was accepted. I heard that about five years ago Pete Rose did an interview, and he said that he wished that I could break that record. Obviously, this time around it was a different vibe. In the 16 years that I have been here, what I’ve noticed is that in America, when people feel like a person is below them, not just in numbers but in general, they will kind of talk you up. But then when you get up to the same level or maybe even higher, they get in attack mode; they are maybe not as supportive. I kind of felt that this time.

There’s a hell of a lot of truth to that. Whatever professional environment you’re in, you’ll see this play out. If you want to know how you’re doing, look at who your enemies and critics are. If they’re senior to you or better-established in your field, you’re probably doing something right. And they’re probably pretty insecure and maybe even a little afraid of you.

The rest of the article is well worth your time. Ichiro seems like a fascinating, insightful and intelligent dude.

There will be no criminal charges arising out of Curt Schilling’s video game debacle

Curt Schilling
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In 2012 Curt Schilling’s video game company, 38 Studios, delivered the fantasy role-playing game it had spent millions of dollars and countless man hours trying to deliver. And then the company folded, leaving both its employees and Rhode Island taxpayers, who underwrote much of the company’s operations via $75 million in loans, holding the bag.

The fallout to 38 Studios’ demise was more than what you see in your average business debacle. Rhode Island accused Schilling and his company of acts tantamount to fraud, claiming that it accepted tax dollars while withholding information about the true state of the company’s finances. Former employees, meanwhile, claimed — quite credibly, according to reports of the matter — that they too were lured to Rhode Island believing that their jobs were far more secure than they were. Many found themselves in extreme states of crisis when Schilling abruptly closed the company’s doors. For his part, Schilling has assailed Rhode Island politicians for using him as a scapegoat and a political punching bag in order to distract the public from their own misdeeds. There seems to be truth to everyone’s claims to some degree.

As a result of all of this, there have been several investigations and lawsuits into 38 Studios’ collapse. In 2012 the feds investigated the company and declined to bring charges. There is currently a civil lawsuit afoot and, alongside it, the State of Rhode Island has investigated for four years to see if anyone could be charged with a crime. Today there was an unexpected press conference in which it was revealed that, no, no one associated with 38 Studios will be charged with anything:

An eight-page explanation of the decision concluded by saying that “the quantity and qualify of the evidence of any criminal activity fell short of what would be necessary to prove any allegation beyond a reasonable doubt and as such the Rules of Professional Conduct precluded even offering a criminal charge for grand jury consideration.”

Schilling will likely crow about this on his various social media platforms, claiming it totally vindicates him. But, as he is a close watcher of any and all events related to Hillary Clinton, he no doubt knows that a long investigation resulting in a declination to file charges due to lack of evidence is not the same thing as a vindication. Bad judgment and poor management are still bad things, even if they’re not criminal matters.

Someone let me know if Schilling’s head explodes if and when someone points that out to him.