Tim Hudson wants you to know he’s not bitter at the Braves

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Bob Nightengale of USA Today wrote an article about Tim Hudson recently that portrayed the Giants right-hander as bitter at the Braves after leaving Atlanta as a free agent this offseason, but now Hudson wants everyone to know that he’s not bitter at all.

Hudson told Mark Bowman of MLB.com that reading Nightengale’s piece “kind of made me feel sick most of yesterday, because that is not the way I felt after the whole process played out.”

Instead, here’s how Hudson describes his parting ways with the Braves after nine seasons in Atlanta:

After the initial offer and all of that, it ended up not being a slap in the face. But initially, it looked like we were not going to go anywhere. The Braves made a push, but we were just too far down the line with the Giants. I still keep up with the Braves like I have my whole life. I still have a lot of great friends in that clubhouse.  I can’t say I don’t still pull for them, because I do, except for when we’re playing them.

Bowman notes that the Braves initially made a one-year, $2 million offer to Hudson, which was pretty insulting considering he eventually got $23 million over two years from the Giants, but apparently Atlanta’s offer to the Georgia native gradually increased.

Hudson is thriving in San Francisco, seamlessly returning from a gruesome ankle injury to go 6-2 with a 1.75 ERA and 50/8 K/BB ratio in 77 innings for the Giants at age 38.

Chris Woodward interviewed for the Yankees’ managerial position

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The Yankees interviewed Aaron Boone for their managerial vacancy on Friday, and today it was Chris Woodward’s turn. That makes at least five interviews since the offseason began, and Woodward’s likely won’t be the last.

Like fellow candidate Eric Wedge, whom the Yankees interviewed just last week, Woodward has never played or coached for the club. He spent the majority of his 12-year career with the Blue Jays and picked up brief stints with the Mets, Braves, Mariners and Red Sox before returning to Toronto for his final season in 2011. Following retirement, he served as the Mariners’ minor league infield coordinator and infield and first base coach from 2012-2015. During the 2015 offseason, he jumped over to the National League to work with the Dodgers as a third base coach, and saw his first postseason run since the Mets lost to the Dodgers in the 2006 NLDS.

While Woodward has yet to manage at the major league level, he was named manager of the New Zealand national team during the 2017 World Baseball Classic qualifiers. It’s certainly conceivable that the Yankees would prefer a candidate with significant experience leading a major league team, but right now the only person who fits that bill is Eric Wedge — and, well, it’s Eric Wedge.