Derek Jeter wants to be an owner. That won’t be an easy trick.

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We’ve heard rumblings about this for years, but on Sunday Derek Jeter reiterated his desire to own and/or run a baseball team someday. Via the New York Post:

“That’s the next goal, buddy . . . Calling the shots, not answering to someone, that’s what interests me. I’d like to think I would be good one . . . I’d probably be a little bit more behind the scenes than the Boss,” he said. “But I learned a lot of things from the Boss.”

It would have to be hands off because any ownership interest Jeter could get in any team would likely be a pretty small minority interest. I mean, yes, by baseball player standards Jeter is rich, but by baseball owner standards he’s not. One of the worst-run franchises in all of professional sports, subject to a somewhat disadvantageous arena deal, is selling for over $2 billion. Jeter’s entire net worth is likely ten percent of that. Tops. At best he could head up an investment group to buy a baseball team, but barring a decidedly disinterested group of investors, he’d likely have less actual power than anyone in it.  At the very least he’d answer to them.

How about some role with the Yankees? If it’s an ownership interest, well, good luck having any power at all. Over the past 40 years the Steinbenner family has taken increasing control of the team, buying out the original group of investors who went in with old George back in 1973 when he held only 51% of the team. There are still a handful of those people around, but their share in the team is shockingly small. They get tickets and swag and meet-and-greets out of it in addition to any profits the Steinbrenners choose to distribute (they may choose not to) but they certainly have no say anything. Maybe the Steinbrenners float Jeter a piece like that as a goodwill gesture, but that sure as heck ain’t ownership.

I feel like the best Jeter could do if he really were to call the shop would be to get into baseball operations. Maybe an apprenticeship deal where he learns the ropes he does not yet know — and really, he may know more than we know; we don’t know that much about Jeter as a person — and eventually turn into a GM or team president type. Over years he gains some power and maybe a bit of equity in a team like Billy Beane has. I feel like that’d be a much better deal and a much more substantive position than being a figurehead for some billionaires.

Diamondbacks place Shelby Miller on the 10-day disabled list

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The Diamondbacks announced on Monday that starter Shelby Miller has been placed on the 10-day disabled list with right elbow inflammation. Miller will get a second opinion on his elbow on Tuesday, per MLB.com’s Steve Gilbert. Pitcher Silvino Bracho has been called up from Triple-A Reno to take Miller’s spot on the roster.

Miller, 26, left Sunday’s start with what was described at the time as forearm tightness. Through his first four starts, Miller is carrying a 4.09 ERA with a 20/12 K/BB ratio in 22 innings.

Bracho, 24, has pitched quite well in 6 2/3 innings of relief at Reno. He’s given up just one unearned run on four hits and a walk (intentional) with 12 strikeouts.

Archie Bradley figures to take Miller’s spot in the starting rotation as Bracho will work middle relief.

Eric Thames hit two more homers

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And John Lackey is livid.

The Brewers’ first baseman homered in each of his first two plate appearances against Reds starter Amir Garrett on Monday evening, helping his team to a 6-1 lead after two frames. The first was a solo blast in the first inning, and the second was a two-run shot to the opposite field in the second inning.

According to MLB.com’s Adam McCalvy, Thames has tied the Brewers’ record for home runs in April with 10. Carlos Lee also hit 10 homers in April 2006.

Seven of Thames’ 10 home runs have come against the Reds. Including his first two at-bats on Monday night, Thames is hitting .379/.474/.924 with 17 RBI along with the 10 dingers. Not too shabby from a guy the Brewers signed to a three-year, $16 million contract during the offseason.

Lackey and Cubs pitching coach Chris Bosio both recently implied Thames is using performance-enhancing drugs, but Thames was tested immediately after last Monday’s game against the Cubs.