The Mets set a record for cheesesteak eating in Philadelphia

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Let’s face it, the Mets probably won’t make the playoffs this season. However, they can at least hang their hats on this little distinction. According to Mike Vorkunov of the Newark Star-Ledger, the team destroyed the one-day record for the number of cheesesteaks eaten in the visitors’ clubhouse in Philadelphia.

Yes, apparently they keep track of such things in Philly. They even have individual and team records for a single day or a series. As for the Mets, their amazing feat of eatery occurred on April 30 as the team was waiting out a rainout:

On April 30, over some ten hours, the Mets ate 103, they say, setting the new single-day team record. Though baseball may be a sequence of individualized events, this was the work of a collective. It was planned two cheesesteaks per person, or more for those that were willing to help out where other teammates could not eat their share.

By the time the Mets left for Denver, distended and at over-capacity, they were now record-holders, breaking the previous mark that stood somewhere in the 80s.

Before you ask, no, Vorkunov didn’t provide any evidence that Bartolo Colon played a significant part in setting the record. In fact, there’s more evidence to suggest that bullpen catchers Dave Racaniello and Eric Langill did most of the damage, as both have set individual records in the past. Anyway, that must have been a pleasant flight to Colorado.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.