Orioles trying to talk Johan Santana into pushing back his opt-out clause

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Johan Santana has been making steady progress in his recovery from multiple shoulder surgeries, but he’s clearly not ready to return to the majors yet and so the Orioles are trying to convince the two-time Cy Young winner to push back the opt-out clause in his contract that goes into effect at midnight today.

Executive vice president Dan Duquette told Eduardo Encina of the Baltimore Sun that the Orioles “think we’ll be able to work something out” with Santana before tonight’s deadline, which makes sense considering the reports last week that they could be planning to call him up to the majors as soon as mid-June.

Initially there was some talk of Santana potentially coming back as a reliever, but he’s looked good enough and stayed healthy enough that the Orioles now have him working as a starter. His velocity has been in the high-80s and, for whatever it’s worth, his results in extended spring training games were very positive.

Report: Mets have discussed a Matt Harvey trade with at least two teams

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Kristie Ackert of the New York Daily News reports that the Mets have discussed a trade involving starter Matt Harvey with at least two teams. Apparently, the Mets were even willing to move Harvey for a reliever.

The Mets tendered Harvey a contract on December 1. He’s entering his third and final year of arbitration eligibility and will likely see a slight bump from last season’s salary of $5.125 million. As a result, there was some thought going into late November that the Mets would non-tender Harvey.

Harvey, 28, made 18 starts and one relief appearance last year and had horrendous results. He put up a 6.70 ERA with a 67/47 K/BB ratio in 92 2/3 innings. Between his performance, his impending free agency, and his injury history, the Mets aren’t likely to get much back in return for Harvey. Even expecting a reliever in return may be too lofty.

Along with bullpen help, the Mets also need help at second base, first base, and the outfield. They don’t have many resources with which to address those needs. Ackert described the Mets’ resources as “a very limited stash of prospects” and “limited payroll space.”