Jose Bautista threw out another runner at first base from right field

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Yesterday, Blue Jays outfielder Jose Bautista retired Royals DH Billy Butler on what appeared to be a line drive single to right field. Bautista fired a laser to first baseman Edwin Encarnacion to retire the slow-footed Butler before he could touch the first base bag.

The Royals were victimized by the 9-3 putout again on Friday night, again by Bautista. Second baseman Omar Infante hit a bloop down the right field line. He assumed it would land in uncaught in foul territory, so he turned his back and didn’t run to first base. Bautista slid, snagged the ball on a hop, and fired to first base before a recovering Infante was within five steps of the bag. Watch:

Marcus Stroman was called for an illegal quick pitch for some reason

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A “quick pitch” is an illegal action in which the pitcher pitches the ball before the batter is prepared. What makes a quick pitch a quick pitch? According to Rule 6.02(a)(5), it’s this:

 . . . Umpires will judge a quick pitch as one delivered before the batter is reasonably set in the batter’s box. With runners on base the penalty is a balk; with no runners on base, it is a ball. The quick pitch is dangerous and should not be permitted.

There are a couple of reasons why you don’t want quick pitches in baseball. In one respect, it’s about safety, as mentioned specifically in the rule. You don’t want a pitcher throwing a 90 m.p.h. fastball in the batter’s general direction if he’s not ready for it, because if it goes off course the batter will have no ability to defend himself and bail. But there’s also a spirit-of-the-game reason for it. The essence of baseball is the face-off between batter and pitcher. While everyone wants the game to move along promptly, the game isn’t really the game if the batter isn’t ready.

There is more art than science to all of this, of course, as all batters and pitchers have different pre-pitch routines, but when you watch a game, there’s a rhythm to all of that. You know the batter is gonna take a couple of practice swings and settle in. The pitcher tends to respect that. The quick pitch rule is rarely invoked for this reason.

It was used in yesterday’s Angels-Blue Jays game, however. And used badly in my view. Watch Marcus Stroman pitch to Kole Calhoun. The ump is Ramon DeJesus. The count was 3-1, so the automatic ball resulted in Calhoun being awarded first base:

Calhoun was obviously upset about something, calling time after Stroman is into his motion (which is not allowed) throwing his hands up and stuff after the pitch. But tell me, in what way was he not “reasonably ready” for that pitch, to use the language of the rule? He’s facing Stroman, looking at him. He’s done with his warmup swings, his bat is up and cocked and he’s standing in hitting position. I understand that it’s a judgment call by the umpire, but it seems to me like the umpire just called time too late because Calhoun didn’t feel ideally comfortable or something.

Either way, it set off Stroman and manager John Gibbons. Gibbons was ejected arguing the call. Stroman, who was otherwise excellent yesterday, was rattled for a bit, giving up a couple of hits and a run afterward. It was Calhoun who scored, natch.

It didn’t affect the outcome, but it certainly seemed like a bad call. And possibly a bad precedent, as batters may now try to lobby harder for quick pitch calls, given its success yesterday. Or, if umpires tend to think that was a bad call too, maybe they’ll overcompensate for it and be less likely to call quick pitches? You never know how this stuff will play out.

Whatever happens, I’ve been against Major League Baseball’s habit of increasingly taking judgment calls away from umpires, trying to make the subjective objective and making a flawed instant replay system the Supreme Court of Baseball Calls. But jeez, it’s hard to argue for allowing umps to hold on to judgment calls when they blow ’em like this.

There will be a street named after Barry Bonds in San Francisco

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The City of San Francisco is not renaming Market Street or some other main drag to honor Barry Bonds or anything, but yes, there will be a “Barry Bonds Street” or “Barry Bonds Avenue” or something like that in San Francisco soon. There will also be streets named after Willie Mays, Juan Marichal and Orlando Cepeda. Willie McCovey will have a park named after him.

This is all part of the redevelopment of the site of Candlestick Park, which was knocked down to make way for a mixed-use development But while the stadium is gone, the names of those who made Candlestick Park famous will be all over the place, mostly in the names of the streets. There will likewise be streets named after San Francisco 49ers luminaries such as Joe Montana, Ronnie Lott, Jerry Rice, Dwight Clark and Bill Walsh. Owner Eddie DeBartolo and executive Carmen Policy get streets too.

Candlestick was home to the Giants for nearly 40 years and hosted a couple of World Series, but due to the wind and cold and the compromises necessary for a multi-use stadium, it wasn’t a great place for baseball. Maybe it’l be a better place to work or shop or whatever.