Tim Hudson’s fountain of youth keeps flowing

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SAN FRANCISCO – It should be obvious now which medieval helmet Michael Morse and Hunter Pence should order for Tim Hudson.

One in the shiny, comb-sided Spanish conquistador style – like the one Ponce de Leon wore while searching for the Fountain of Youth.

[RELATED: Instant Replay: Giants back to winning ways, shut out Cubs]

The difference is that Hudson actually has stumbled upon it. The 38-year-old right-hander dragged his repaired ankle and his sore hip to the mound Tuesday night and pitched like he was trying to finish chores before sundown. He scattered six hits over seven sprightly shutout innings and didn’t allow a runner to reach third base in the Giants’ 4-0 victory over the Chicago Cubs Tuesday night.

Hudson remained unbeaten (8-0) in 14 home starts over the past two seasons as a Giant and a Brave. He has a 1.92 ERA. He’s the first Giant to post a sub-2 mark through 10 starts since Dave LaPoint in 1985.

Did he know he was capable of this?

“Of course!” he said, with mock pride. “You know what, it’s early in the year (but) I couldn’t have asked for a better start to my season with a new team, new teammates and a new organization. I hope they don’t think I’ll be this good all year. Hopefully I can stay healthy, stay strong and keep on keepin’ on.”

They’re saying the Giants have the best record in the NL but no obvious All-Stars on their roster. If they picked sides now, Hudson would be an obvious choice to make it for the fourth time in his career.

“It’d be a great honor, especially coming off an injury wondering if I’d pitch again,” said Hudson, who was carted off on a stretcher last July in New York with a fractured ankle. “But it’s 10 starts. There’s 25 more.”

Always, the first and last caveat is health. Hudson was coming off a rain-shortened three-inning start at Coors Field in which he limited the Rockies to one run despite seven baserunners. That was his only test since skipping his previous turn with a strained left hip.

He said there was some accumulated rust, even if the Cubs didn’t make him pay for his mistakes.

“I actually got away with a couple pitches,” he said. “Guys made some good plays behind me, like they always do. I tried to do the same thing, just make the guys behind me look as good as they can and keep the pace up.”

Pablo Sandoval blooped a single to extend his streak to seven games with an RBI, three off the San Francisco-era record held by Jeff Kent and Matt Williams. Buster Posey didn’t get any hits to interrupt his slump, but he managed a pair of sacrifice flies.

Hudson didn’t need any more than that. He had no idea if this ranks as his best 10-start run to begin a season.

“From a command standpoint, though, it’s probably the best as far as throwing strikes and letting guys behind me make plays,” he said. “I don’t really try to overpower anybody. I don’t try to overthrow through my mechanics. Just let it flow and most of the time it’s been working out.”

And yes, he’s glad he came here. He has 44 strikeouts and just six walks in 70.1 innings, and the ballpark plays into that. So did Mike Olt’s double off the wall, which would’ve been out in most parks.

“AT&T Park, chalk it up,” Hudson said, grinning. “This is a great pitcher’s park, great weather. It’s a great place to pitch. It’s all positive and no negative. You can go out and challenge guys. I’ve got the confidence to attack the strike zone and not nibble so much.”

As for his hip, he said he didn’t have any issues with it. The reconstructed ankle does get cranky later in games, but he comes in early to get treatment and it’s “as 100 percent as it’s going to get, I think.”

The rest is fine tuning. And when you’ve driven a classic car long enough, you understand how to keep it running.

“I’m not going to kill myself on the side or long toss or try to throw 95 mph,” he said. “What I have is what I have.”

And what does he have, exactly?

“Smoke and mirrors, man,” he said, with another grin. “Smoke and mirrors.”

Another month like this and Hudson might see his reflection wearing an NL All-Star uniform. And maybe Ponce de Leon’s helmet, too.

How long do you stay a fan of a team that left town?

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File this under “not a really deep thought, but there isn’t much going on this morning, so why not?”

I was catching up with the latest, and final, season of “The Americans” over the weekend. I will give no spoilers and ask that you do the same, but I want to talk about something that came up in the second episode.

The episode takes place in October 1987 and a character is listening to a Twins playoff game on the radio. He later talks about baseball and the Twins with some other characters. The context is not important, but the guy — probably in his mid-late 40s, living in the Washington D.C. area — makes a point to say that he has been a Twins fan since the beginning, and then says he was, in fact, a fan of the franchise back when they were still the Washington Senators.

In case you are unaware, the original Washington Senators moved to Minnesota following the 1960 season and became the Twins. At the same time an expansion team, also called the Senators, was placed in D.C. to replace them. That franchise would stay in D.C. for 11 seasons before moving to Texas in 1972 to become the Rangers.

In light if that, am I the only one who has a hard time buying that such a man actually existed? How would the character, who was a kid when the original Senators moved, be a Twins fan some 26 years later?

There were relatively few televised baseball games back then. Just a game of the week and some out of town coverage of local teams. There was obviously no internet. Outside of the 1965 World Series, it’d be a shock if more than a couple of Twins games were broadcast to the D.C. area during the rest of the guy’s childhood. Maybe he kept up with the Senators players like Harmon Killebrew and Bob Allison via box scores, baseball cards and The Sporting News, but I couldn’t imagine a D.C. guy raised on the Senators keeping up with the Twins through the 1970s and 1980s. Would he not become a new Senators fan or, eventually, a Rangers fan? Maybe, like so many people on the D.C. area, he picked up the Orioles as his team due to their 1960s-70s dominance? Any number of things could happen, but I’m struggling to imagine the existence of a Senators guy who becomes a hardcore Twins fans up to and including 1987.

All of that got me thinking about other relocated teams.

The Dodgers are the most famous example, of course, with the narrative being that Dodgers fans in Brooklyn felt betrayed by Walter O’Malley and thus turned their back on the club, later adopting the Mets as their rooting interest. The betrayal narrative is less pronounced with the Giants, but that’s the same general story with them too. I mean, there’s a reason the Mets picked orange and blue as their colors. They wanted to, and largely did, co-opt the old NL New York fans.

I’m sure a lot more Dodgers and Giants fans continued to follow their teams in California than would let on, given that many of the same players starred out there in the ensuing years, but that likely died out as those players retired. Bob Aspromonte was the last Brooklyn Dodger to play in the bigs, retiring after the 1971 season. Willie Mays played through 1973. I assume NL fans in New York kept some nice thoughts for them — particularly because the Mets picked both of them up for the tail end of their careers — but I can’t see those guys rooting for, say, Steve Garvey and John Montefusco in 1979.

Others:

  • There likely aren’t many St. Louis Browns fans left — they last played in Missouri 65 years ago — but even if the ones they had in 1953 felt like rooting for the Cardinals was impossible, I bet most of their kids and grandkids became Cards fans;
  • The A’s fans in Philly — and later Kansas City — probably have a similar story. I mean, there’s a reason that franchise skipped town twice, so to expect undying love over the decades, with the Phillies and Royals around, is a bit much. The Philadelphia A’s glory years were like 90s years ago now anyway, and all of those fans are dead. The A’s modern glory years have all come in Oakland. No one in Philadelphia or Kansas City is looking to the California with an aching in their heart;
  • I could imagine someone’s grandfather in Milwaukee still thinking that the Braves are his team, but not many other people. The Braves won a World Series and two pennants in Milwaukee, but that was an awful long time ago and they moved to Atlanta before the A’s moved to Oakland. Don’t even get me started about Boston Braves fans. They all have to either be dead or have long since moved on. Following a team to a new city is a big ask, but following them to two new cities over 66 years seems pathological. UPDATE: OK, there are some pathological people out there.
  • I have some Nationals fan friends and they tell me that there is a small, weird contingent of Expos fans who root for Washington now. I get that since it wasn’t terribly long ago, but was Brad Wilkerson really a good enough reason to carry a torch? I’d like to talk to some of those people and ask them about their value system;
  • The only other team to move was the Seattle Pilots. They played one season in Seattle and no one would remember that if it wasn’t for Jim Bouton’s book, “Ball Four.” If you find someone claiming to be a Pilots fan in Seattle, you’ve found yourself a hipster peddling revisionist b.s.

Anyway, that’s a lot of words wasted on a couple of lines from a TV show, but as always, your thoughts are appreciated.