Dr. James Andrews releases a position paper on the Tommy John surgery epidemic

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We have posted about this a few times when Dr. James Andrews has given interviews on the subject of what he calls an “epidemic” in UCL tears and attendant Tommy John surgery. But now he and his American Sports Medicine have released a position paper on the matter.

In it he outlines the risk factors for Tommy John surgery, common misconceptions about it and his recommendations for pitchers and teams to limit the risk of needing it. As for that last part, this recommendation is likely to get the most play and, if heeded, affect the most change:

Do not always pitch with 100% effort. The best professional pitchers pitch with a range of ball velocity, good ball movement, good control, and consistent mechanics among their pitches. The professional pitcher’s objectives are to prevent baserunners and runs, not to light up the radar gun.

I think major league teams know that in practice once they have a pitcher and are developing him. But the defining trait of a scout is his radar gun, and young pitchers are conditioned to want to light it up when they see a scout checking them out. Good pitchers change speed and create movement. Young pitchers get noticed, however, when they throw in the 90s. It’ll be interesting to see if this changes that at all.

Anyway, consider thus must-click material. And something to bookmark if you’re at all interested in the subject.

Kenley Jansen’s consecutive saves streak ends at 34

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Dodgers closer Kenley Jansen gave up three runs in the top of the ninth inning during Sunday’s game against the Braves, blowing his first save since August 26 last season. He had converted 34 consecutive saves.

Jansen yielded back-to-back singles to lead off the ninth inning, staked to a 4-1 lead. After getting two outs, Matt Adams hit a three-run home run down the right field line to knot the game at four apiece.

After Sunday’s lackluster performance, Jansen is now 24-for-25 in save chances this season with a 1.49 ERA and a 62/2 K/BB ratio in 42 1/3 innings.

Zach Britton sets American League record with 55th consecutive save

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Orioles closer Zach Britton finished Sunday’s 9-7 victory over the Astros with a scoreless ninth inning, earning his sixth save of the season. He has now earned the save in 55 consecutive opportunities dating back to September 2015, setting a new American League record. Tom Gordon previously held the record with 54 consecutive saves. Eric Gagne holds the major league record at 84.

Britton’s last blown save came on September 20, 2015, then converted two more saves before the end of the regular season. He went 47-for-47 in save chances last season and is six-for-six so far this year.

Along with his six saves, Britton has a 2.65 ERA and a 13/8 K/BB ratio in 17 innings this season. The lefty came off the disabled list earlier this month after missing two months with a strained left forearm.