Dr. James Andrews releases a position paper on the Tommy John surgery epidemic

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We have posted about this a few times when Dr. James Andrews has given interviews on the subject of what he calls an “epidemic” in UCL tears and attendant Tommy John surgery. But now he and his American Sports Medicine have released a position paper on the matter.

In it he outlines the risk factors for Tommy John surgery, common misconceptions about it and his recommendations for pitchers and teams to limit the risk of needing it. As for that last part, this recommendation is likely to get the most play and, if heeded, affect the most change:

Do not always pitch with 100% effort. The best professional pitchers pitch with a range of ball velocity, good ball movement, good control, and consistent mechanics among their pitches. The professional pitcher’s objectives are to prevent baserunners and runs, not to light up the radar gun.

I think major league teams know that in practice once they have a pitcher and are developing him. But the defining trait of a scout is his radar gun, and young pitchers are conditioned to want to light it up when they see a scout checking them out. Good pitchers change speed and create movement. Young pitchers get noticed, however, when they throw in the 90s. It’ll be interesting to see if this changes that at all.

Anyway, consider thus must-click material. And something to bookmark if you’re at all interested in the subject.

Rays pitcher Brent Honeywell leaves BP session with possible injury

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This is not good: Marc Topkin of the Tampa Bay Times reports that Rays pitcher Brent Honeywell cut short a bullpen session this morning and left the field with a trainer. Topkin says Honeywell was “clearly upset” as he made his way into the clubhouse and “cursed loudly a few times.”

Obviously you don’t want to assume the worst, but that’s often the behavior of a pitcher who experienced a serious injury. We will get updates later and will provide an update when we hear.

UPDATE:

Honeywell, probably the Rays’ top prospect, is slated to make his major league debut early this season, though possibly not for a few weeks into the season due to off days. Eventually, though, it is assumed he’d slot in someplace behind Chris Archer, Matt Andriese, Nathan Eovaldi, Jake Faria, and Blake Snell, either as a young-David Price-style swingman, a spot starter or a regular starter at some point.

Last year Honeywell posted a 3.49 ERA and 172/35 K/BB ratio in 136. innings in 26 starts between Double-A Montgomery and Triple-A Durham.