Settling the Scores: Sunday’s results

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I know Monday is usually an “And That Happened” day, but it’s also Memorial Day and, based on my reading of the traffic stats from the past couple of big no-work holidays, most of you have other things you’d rather do than read blog posts at 6:30 in the morning. So let us just get to the scores and give those of you who don’t have other things you’d rather do get right to the comments section in which you lament/cheer your team in far more detailed terms than I do up here. Cool? Cool.

Dodgers 6, Phillies 0: OK, I will chime in for this one, if for no other reason than to tip my cap at Josh Beckett for one of the rarest accomplishments in all of baseball: making a Josh Beckett-pitched game last only two hours and thirty-seven minutes. I mean, heck, there are a couple three no-hitters every year. The real rarity here is a Beckett game not dragging on to the 3:40 mark or longer.

Brewers 7, Marlins 1
Blue Jays 3, Athletics 1
Diamondbacks 2, Mets 1; Mets 4, Diamondbacks 2
Rangers 12, Tigers 4
Orioles 4, Indians 2
Nationals 5, Pirates 2
Rays 8, Red Sox 5
Giants 8, Twins 1
Yankees 7, White Sox 1
Padres 4, Cubs 3
Angels 4, Royals 3
Astros 4, Mariners 1
Braves 7, Rockies 0
Cardinals 4, Reds 0

Troy Tulowitzki poses as a pitcher on photo day

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Update: The photographer was apparently in on the action, according to Topps. Still pretty funny. (Hat tip: Mike Ashmore)

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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.