Mets release Jose Valverde, fire hitting coach Dave Hudgens

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It’s a busy afternoon in Queens, as the Mets have released reliever Jose Valverde and fired hitting coach Dave Hudgens.

Valverde never secured the closer gig in New York, but he was reasonably effective before an ugly outing today–or at least as effective as the Mets could have possibly expected him to be–with a 4.05 ERA and 23/9 K/BB ratio in 20 innings. He gave up four runs today to inflate that ERA to 5.66.

Hudgens, meanwhile, takes the fall for an offense that currently ranks 14th among NL teams in OPS but is actually tied for fifth in runs per game with 3.92, just slightly below the league average of 3.95. Hitting coaches are notoriously tough to evaluate or analyze, but the Mets’ lineup isn’t exactly filled with high-upside bats.

This was his fourth season as the Mets’ hitting coach and in the previous three years the lineup ranked 11th, 12th, and 6th in runs scored among NL teams, so considering the lack of results he certainly got a lengthy leash. Minor league hitting coordinator Lamar Johnson has been named as Hudgens’ replacement.

Didi Gregorius continues to be ridiculous

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Yankees shortstop Didi Gregorius had another fantastic night last night. He went 3-for-3, hitting a home run for the fourth game in a row, had an RBI single and reached base safely in all five of his plate appearances in New York’s 7-4 win over Minnesota.

For the year that gives Gregorius a line of .372/.470/.833, putting him atop the American League in average, slugging, OPS, and OPS+. He also leads the league in total bases (65) and RBI (29). He leads all of baseball in fWAR at 2.2, edging out Mike Trout despite the fact that Trout has played in two more games. He’s second behind Trout in homers with nine.

After last night’s game he insisted that he is not a home run hitter:

“I do have a lot of home runs, but it’s not like I am going out there to try to hit them . . . I’m not a power guy like Judge and Stanton, who hit 50 to 60 and up. Those are the guys who actually hit home runs. One year, let’s say, I hit five — then you ask me where that part went . . . if they go out, they go out. I’m just mostly trying to barrel it up and get a good swing . . . I try to hit line drives and if you check most of my home runs they were line drives,” he said. “It’s not like I am going up to hit deep fly balls.”

Given that he hit 25 homers last year and 20 the year before, he’s being a bit modest, even if he’s not likely to keep up this torrid pace. That modesty is not stopping some people from getting a bit carried away, of course:

 

We’ll forgive Bob for the hyperbole. Didi has been fun to watch.