Jose Fernandez’s attorney says a prior, undetected injury led to his torn UCL

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This is  . . . odd. The Miami Herald is reporting that Jose Fernandez’s attorney released a statement on Friday following Fernandez’s Tommy John surgery in which he claimed that a previous injury, not detected by the Marlins, led to Fernandez’s torn UCL and thus his surgery:

Jose Fernandez’s arm injury was precipitated by a chain reaction of events that began when a line drive struck him in the thigh in his next-to-last game, according to the pitcher’s friend and attorney.

That “prompted a completely unanticipated change in delivery which neither the staff nor his coaches could discern,” culminating in a “traumatic” arm injury when Fernandez pitched next on May 9 in San Diego, said his Tampa-based attorney, Ralph Fernandez, in a statement that was released Friday after the pitcher underwent Tommy John surgery in Los Angeles.

Clark Spencer of the Herald got quotes from Mike Redmond and other Marlins saying that no one noticed anything wrong with Fernandez’s mechanics and that Fernandez did not complain of any other injuries or discomfort. And that, if he had those things, he should have reported it to someone and the team would have dealt with it. Which, to me anyway, sounds pretty darn reasonable.

But put that aside for a second: why on Earth is a player having his lawyer issue statements like this? Statements containing phrasing that sounds like the sort of language lawyers put in complaints and things. Not that Fernandez is going to sue or anything — some lawyers can’t help themselves and always speak as if they’re drafting complaints — but it’s just really unusual to see this kind of stuff.

The lawyer says he released the statement “in order to reduce speculation.” In doing so, I believe he has achieved the exact opposite result.

Enrique Hernandez’s performance one for the record books

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Entering Thursday’s NLCS Game 5, Dodgers outfielder Enrique Hernandez had never hit a home run nor even driven in a run in the playoffs in his four-year career. He had homered twice in a regular season game just twice and his career-high for RBI in a game was four.

Hernandez hit three home runs and knocked in seven runs to help power the Dodgers past the Cubs 11-1 to win the National League pennant and punch their ticket to the World Series. His first homer was a solo homer to center field in the second inning off of starter Jose Quintana. He blasted a grand slam to right field off of Hector Rondon in the fourth, then tacked on a two-run blast in the ninth inning off of Mike Montgomery to make it 11-1.

Hernandez is the 10th player to hit three home runs in a postseason game. Jose Altuve, of course, did it two weeks ago in Game 1 of the ALDS against the Red Sox. Before Altuve, Pablo Sandoval (2012), Albert Pujols (2011), and Adrian Beltre (2011) were the last players to accomplish the feat.

Hernandez’s seven RBI set a new National League record for a postseason game. Only four other players — Troy O’Leary, John Valentin, Mo Vaughn, and Edgar Martinez — accomplished the feat.

No one has hit three home runs and knocked in seven-plus in a game… until Hernandez. He certainly picked a good time to break out.