Daily News I-Team is all over A-Rod’s bad decisions from a year ago; mum on MLB’s.

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Take this Daily News story for what it’s worth: old news which has been mooted by months of more recent events. But if you’re into the sordid backstory of A-Rod’s fight with Major League Baseball, the award-winning Daily News I-Team would like you to know that A-Rod was going to quit last summer — retire from baseball and not fight MLB’s discipline — but he was convinced not to by Desiree Perez, a woman with a hefty criminal record that, somehow, has close ties to Jay-Z’s Roc Nation Sports.

For what it’s worth, a source with knowledge of the Biogenesis investigation suggested to me last year that, at some point, Perez did have A-Rod’s ear and was somewhat troublingly influential in A-Rod’s decision making process, so there is probably not a ton of reason to doubt the veracity of this report. It goes along with a long line of stories over the years where Rodriguez responded positively to someone telling him he should act aggressively in some way, shape or form, be it legally or with business matters or what have you. He’s not exactly a mastermind. He’s easily influenced, it would appear. Not shocking.

That notwithstanding, the Daily News coming out with this today is rather hilarious given that (a) A-Rod’s decision making from last year has long been mooted given his decision to drop his legal case against MLB, accept his suspension and move on. Indeed, just this past week we heard that A-Rod is living a relatively quiet life of paying attention to his business and keeping in shape in an effort to come back next year. Even his ex-wife had wonderful things to say regarding the way in which A-Rod was going about his business as of late. We don’t hear much from the Daily News about that.

We also haven’t heard a peep from the Daily News about the story which emerged a week ago in which Major League Baseball was said by the Boca Raton police department to have knowingly purchased stolen documents during its investigation. I guess bad stuff that MLB did last year in an effort to get A-Rod is old, irrelevant news. Bad advice A-Rod took last year in an effort to fight MLB, however, deserves this sensationalist treatment.

Great job, I-Team! Way to stay on top of everything in a comprehensive and totally non-selective fashion!

The Yankees attendance and revenue is down, but it makes sense

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There’s a long article in the New York Times today noting that the Yankees attendance is down and that, based on financial figures released as part of their stadium bond disclosures, ticket and suite revenues through last season have fallen by $166 million since the end of 2009.

There is a lot of talk in the article about the exciting young team the Yankees have put together and how much they’ve won so far in the early going. And there is a lot of talk about marketing and demographics — Hal Steinbrenner talks about baseball’s “millennial problem” — but the story of the Yankees’ box office issues, such as they are, is pretty straightforward.

All teams suffer attendance and revenue decline when they play poorly. While the Yankees have not been bad for a long, long time, that’s a somewhat relative thing. They Yankees have sold themselves and sold their fans on the idea that nothing short of a championship is acceptable, so missing the playoffs for three of the past four years is bad for them. Fans don’t want to go see a bad team, be it Yankees fans, Rays fans, Royals fans or whoever.

Despite the recent lack of success, the Yankees have still, perversely, continued to price their tickets, concessions, parking and everything else as though they’re the only game in town. When demand falls and prices remain super high, fewer people are buying your product. Even if you’re the New York Yankees.

The Yankees are good this year. What’s more, they’re good in that exciting way that only young promising players bursting out onto the scene can deliver. It’s a wonderful thing for marketing and stuff, but even under the best of circumstances, ticket sales tend to lag on field success, often by as much as a year. Go back and look at World Series winning teams — especially the surprise winners — and you’ll see that it’s the year after on-field success when the real attendance bumps happen. I expect, if the Yankees continue to play well, their gate will get really nice by the end of the summer, but I suspect we’ll also see a more dramatic bump next year.

Taken all together, this is a dog-bites-man story. The Yankees are not some transcendent institution, immune from market forces. They’re just one of 30 Major League Baseball teams competing against other entertainments for a finite amount of the public’s money and attention. Nothin’ to see here.

David Price had a rocky rehab start last night

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Red Sox starter David Price has been rehabbing a left elbow injury since early March. Last night he made his latest rehab outing for Triple-A Pawtucket. It didn’t go well.

Price allowed six runs — three earned — on seven hits in three and two-thirds innings, requiring 89 pitches to do it. His velocity was good, but otherwise it was a night to forget. This was supposed to be Price’s last rehab start before returning to the Sox’ big league rotation, but one wonders if he’s ready for it.

Price didn’t talk to the media after the game, but Pawtucket’s manager said he was “upbeat” and “felt good.” For his part, John Farrell, upon hearing about the outing, said this:

“There’s no announcement at this point. We’ve got to sit with him and talk about what’s best for him, best for us as we move forward.”

The Sox could really use Price back in the rotation given their injury problems, but rushing him back if he’s not ready is certainly not ideal.

Stay tuned.