Astros GM says top prospect Jon Singleton is “on deck” for a call-up

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Jon Singleton is thriving at Triple-A and the Astros are getting horrendous production at first base, so it sounds like Houston may soon be ready to call up the 22-year-old top prospect.

Singleton, who was acquired from the Phillies in the Hunter Pence trade and ranked as a consensus top-100 prospect in each of the past four seasons, is hitting .293 with 12 homers and a 1.030 OPS in 38 games at Triple-A and he’s made good strides with his strikeout-to-walk ratio as well.

So when might he arrive in Houston? Here’s what general manager Jeff Luhnow told Brian McTaggart of MLB.com:

Singleton’s progressing. We see him as a guy who’s close to being able to contribute at the major league level. We’re excited. We’ve all seen the reaction the fans had at bringing up prospects like [George] Springer and last year with [Jarred] Cosart and we have more coming. I would say Singleton is on deck.

As usual service time considerations could play a part in Singleton’s call-up and late June would clear the various hurdles in terms of avoiding Super Two arbitration status down the road, but it might be tough to wait that long if he keeps posting a 1.000 OPS and the Astros’ first basemen keep hitting below .200.

Yankees sign Adam Lind to a minor league deal. Again.

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The Yankees signed Adam Lind to a minor league deal this past offseason. Then they released him during spring training. Now they have signed him to another minor league deal. He’ll report to extended spring training where he’ll now try not to get extended released.

Lind is a platoon guy with little defensive value, but he hit .303/.362/.513 with 14 home runs and 59 RBI in 301 plate appearances for the Nationals last season, serving as a pinch-hitter and backup first baseman and outfielder. The injury to Greg Bird and the impending suspension of Tyler Austin — he’s currently on appeal — will likely give him at least some opportunity to show that he’s still a big leaguer.

Which, yeah, he probably still is. Or at least would be if teams didn’t have 13 and 14-man pitching staffs and actually had room for a couple of bench position players. Such is not the current game of baseball, however.