MLB changes the controversial scoring decision from Yu Darvish’s near-no-no

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Last Friday night Yu Darvish technically had his no-hitter broken up by a clean David Ortiz single in the ninth. In reality, if the official scorer of that game had done what every other official scorer does, it would’ve been broken up in the seventh when Ortiz lofted one between the second baseman and the right fielder, and having it drop in. That’s almost always ruled a hit, but the scorer called it an error.

That call has now been changed by Major League Baseball.

Definite mixed feelings on this. In an ideal world, mental errors that lead to balls dropping without being touched should be errors. They are miscues and mistakes and why more fielder’s aren’t credited with errors for making them is beyond me. On the other hand, if you’re going to make this corrective, you do it via an official action or instruction from Major League Baseball to its scorers, you don’t change the convention on the fly, in a situation that, by sheer coincidence, I’m sure, aided the home player pursuing history.

But we can all agree on this: no way this gets changed if Darvish completed the no-hitter by retiring Ortiz in the ninth. I can’t feature MLB erasing a no-no that got celebrated on the field and which likely would have led to memorabilia sales and all of that.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.