Alex Rodriguez AP

So far the response to MLB being accused of buying stolen documents is . . . crickets

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Question: a report in an actual newspaper sourced by actual police documents revealed that, in the mind of an actual police department, officials with Major League Baseball knowingly and contrary to the warnings of said actual police department purchased stolen merchandise. That report came out last night. And since then, the response to it all has been . . . silence.

I wrote stuff about it. Some people tweeted some things. But unlike almost any other story of even half that magnitude involving drugs, crimes, A-Rod or even the mundane stuff of MLB management, there have been no major media people weighing in. No blog posts or columns from mainstream people at ESPN New York or Fox . No Daily News I-Team report. No radio shows touching on it that I’ve seen. Yes, it’s all been learned by people today for the most part, but usually by 5:30pm on the day of, we’d have some coverage from the online outlets and radio and probably even a quick, early version of whatever is going to run in the newspapers tomorrow. A Madden or a Lupica quick take. I’m not saying this is a “everyone drop everything and make it your top story” kind of story, but you damn well that if A-Rod farted in a hot tub in Cabo last night there would be wall-to-wall coverage from the usual suspects by now.

Obviously I’m not a dispassionate observer on this subject. My biases are well known and have long been on display. I’m not and never was happy with the way MLB carried out the Biogenesis investigation. I’m not and never was happy with the way all of that and, specifically, the A-Rod parts of it were covered by the media. I believe there was and continues to be a tremendous loss of perspective when it comes to PEDs in baseball and I believe that the tendency to make guys who violate the drug rules into the darkest villains as opposed to mere rule breakers to be pretty odious.

But with that acknowledged, doesn’t it seem strange to you that none of the people who offered wall-to-wall opinions about A-Rod’s ethical failures and even his evil — remember; Madden of the Daily News compared him to Whitey Bulger — there hasn’t been anyone besides a few of us loon jobs in the blogosphere willing to wade into the possibility that MLB committed a pretty major transgression here and that maybe — just maybe — it’s a relevant coda to the Biogenesis story? Especially if you’re someone like the Daily News I-Team, which touts the awards it won for covering the Biogenesis story on its front page.

If I missed something or if something comes out soon in which these folks opine on the Newsday report in the manner they opined on every other aspect of the Biogenesis story I’ll update. For now, though, I’ll hang up and listen.

CC Sabathia wants to pitch beyond 2017

BOSTON, MA - SEPTEMBER 18: CC Sabathia #52 of the New York Yankees pitches during the fifth inning against the Boston Red Sox at Fenway Park on September 18, 2016 in Boston, Massachusetts. The Red Sox won 5-4. (Photo by Rich Gagnon/Getty Images)
Rich Gagnon/Getty Images
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CC Sabathia‘s contract with the Yankees expires after the 2017 season but the lefty feels that he has enough left in the tank to pitch in 2018 and beyond, Mark Feinsand of the New York Daily News reports.

Sabathia said, “I just know myself. I know I feel like it’s not my time yet. Barring any crazy injuries I know I can pitch past next year. I feel like this is just the beginning of what I’m trying to do. I feel like there’s a lot more still to learn and a lot better to get. It’s exciting.”

The 36-year-old lefty currently holds a 4.02 ERA and a 144/63 K/BB ratio in 172 1/3 innings. It’s his best and healthiest season since 2012. He battled a knee injury last season and checked into rehab for alcohol addiction last October. Sabathia said that being treated for his addiction put him “in a good spot.”

Sabathia is owed $25 million through a vesting option for the 2017 season.

Red Sox lose on Mark Teixeira’s walkoff grand slam, but still clinch AL East

NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 28:  Dustin Pedroia #15 and pinch runner Marco Hernandez #41 of the Boston Red Sox celebrate after both scored in the eighth inning against the New York Yankees at Yankee Stadium on September 28, 2016 in the Bronx borough of New York City.  (Photo by Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)
Jim McIsaac/Getty Images
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The Red Sox can thank the Orioles for not having to fight to clinch the division on Thursday or later. The Orioles came from behind to defeat the Blue Jays 3-2 on Wednesday evening, clinching the AL East for the Red Sox.

A few minutes after that game went final, the Red Sox squandered a 3-0 lead taken in the eighth inning, culminating in a walk-off grand slam by Mark Teixeira in the bottom of the ninth inning. Closer Craig Kimbrel started the ninth, but didn’t have control over any of his pitches. He allowed a leadoff single followed by three consecutive walks to force in a run. Joe Kelly relieved Kimbrel and seemed to be close to wriggling out of the jam, getting Starlin Castro to strike out looking and Didi Gregorius to pop up. But after starting Teixeira with a first-pitch curve ball for a strike, Teixera clobbered a 99 MPH fastball, sending it over the fence in right-center to end the game.

For the Yankees, the come-from-behind victory was crucial as it staved off Wild Card elimination for one more day.

This is the first time the Red Sox have clinched the AL East since 2013, also the last year they won the World Series.