Alex Rodriguez AP

So far the response to MLB being accused of buying stolen documents is . . . crickets

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Question: a report in an actual newspaper sourced by actual police documents revealed that, in the mind of an actual police department, officials with Major League Baseball knowingly and contrary to the warnings of said actual police department purchased stolen merchandise. That report came out last night. And since then, the response to it all has been . . . silence.

I wrote stuff about it. Some people tweeted some things. But unlike almost any other story of even half that magnitude involving drugs, crimes, A-Rod or even the mundane stuff of MLB management, there have been no major media people weighing in. No blog posts or columns from mainstream people at ESPN New York or Fox . No Daily News I-Team report. No radio shows touching on it that I’ve seen. Yes, it’s all been learned by people today for the most part, but usually by 5:30pm on the day of, we’d have some coverage from the online outlets and radio and probably even a quick, early version of whatever is going to run in the newspapers tomorrow. A Madden or a Lupica quick take. I’m not saying this is a “everyone drop everything and make it your top story” kind of story, but you damn well that if A-Rod farted in a hot tub in Cabo last night there would be wall-to-wall coverage from the usual suspects by now.

Obviously I’m not a dispassionate observer on this subject. My biases are well known and have long been on display. I’m not and never was happy with the way MLB carried out the Biogenesis investigation. I’m not and never was happy with the way all of that and, specifically, the A-Rod parts of it were covered by the media. I believe there was and continues to be a tremendous loss of perspective when it comes to PEDs in baseball and I believe that the tendency to make guys who violate the drug rules into the darkest villains as opposed to mere rule breakers to be pretty odious.

But with that acknowledged, doesn’t it seem strange to you that none of the people who offered wall-to-wall opinions about A-Rod’s ethical failures and even his evil — remember; Madden of the Daily News compared him to Whitey Bulger — there hasn’t been anyone besides a few of us loon jobs in the blogosphere willing to wade into the possibility that MLB committed a pretty major transgression here and that maybe — just maybe — it’s a relevant coda to the Biogenesis story? Especially if you’re someone like the Daily News I-Team, which touts the awards it won for covering the Biogenesis story on its front page.

If I missed something or if something comes out soon in which these folks opine on the Newsday report in the manner they opined on every other aspect of the Biogenesis story I’ll update. For now, though, I’ll hang up and listen.

Tim Tebow’s workout seems like fun

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Tim Tebow is, as we speak, working out for some 40 scouts from 20 organizations and an untold number of members of the media. So far he has run and jumped and thrown and, in a moment or two, will take his hacks. First BP swings, then live, full-speed BP off of a couple of former major leaguers.

His 60 yard dash time was supposedly excellent. On the 80-20 scouting scale he’s supposedly in the 50-60 range, according to people tweeting about it who know what they’re talking about. The guy is certainly big and strong and in amazing shape and that’s not nothing.

Also this:

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That’s from MLB’s Twitter, which provides us with some more in-action shots.

 

Here he is playing right field out there in the distance someplace:

Good luck, kid.

Adrian Beltre puts his helmet on backwards to face a switch pitcher

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“A” switch pitcher is probably not the most accurate way to put that. It’s more like “The” switch pitcher, as Pat Venditte of the Mariners is the only one extant.

Last night the right-handed hitting Adrian Beltre had to face Venditte, who obviously chose to pitch righty to the Rangers third baseman. Before coming up to the plate, Beltre jokingly donned his helmet backwards and pretended that he’d hit left-handed:

 

He needn’t have bothered. Beltre doubled to left field off of Venditte, showing that at some point, platoon splits really don’t matter.