Brandon Belt will have pins inserted into broken thumb

3 Comments

Giants first baseman Brandon Belt was placed on the disabled list on Saturday morning with a broken left thumb that he suffered Friday night when he was struck by a Paul Maholm pitch. After a visit with hand specialist Dr. Tim McAdams, the situation is looking even grimmer. From beat reporter Andrew Baggarly of CSNBayArea.com

Giants first baseman Brandon Belt will undergo surgery on Tuesday to insert two pins in his fractured left thumb, but the club still believes he can be ready to return in six weeks.

Dr. Tim McAdams will perform the procedure to stabilize multiple fractures in his proximal phalanx.

The pins won’t be removed for four weeks, which makes that six-week full-recovery timetable seem overly optimistic. Belt is going to have to ease back into hitting drills once the pins are out and will then have to go on a minor league rehab assignment to get his timing right. Baggarly writes Sunday that it’s “hard to envision him playing many games before the All-Star break, if at all.”

Belt, 26, had an .820 OPS (135 OPS+) with nine home runs and 18 RBI in 35 games this season.

Mike Morse is going to serve as the Giants’ primary first baseman through at least mid-June.

Danny Farquhar in critical condition after suffering ruptured aneurysm

Danny Farquhar
AP Images
6 Comments

Awful news for the White Sox and reliever Danny Farquhar: the right-hander remains hospitalized with a brain hemorrhage, per a team announcement on Saturday. He’s in stable but critical condition after sustaining a “ruptured aneurysm [that] caused the brain bleed” on Friday.

Farquhar, 31, passed out in the dugout during the sixth inning of Friday’s game against the Astros. He regained consciousness shortly after the incident and was taken to RUSH University Medical Center, where he’s expected to continue treatment with Dr. Demetrius Lopez in the neurological ICU unit.

“It takes your breath away a little bit,” club manager Rick Renteria said following the game. “One of your guys is down there and you have no idea what’s going on. […] When one of your teammates or anybody you know has an episode, even if it’s not a teammate, something is going on, you realize everything else you keep in perspective. Everything has its place. It’s one of our guys, so we are glad he was conscious when he left here.”