Nolan Arenado AP

Nolan Arenado’s hitting streak halted at 28 games

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Rockies third baseman Nolan Arenado broke the Rockies’ club record when he hit in his 28th consecutive game on Thursday night, but the pursuit of Joe DiMaggio’s Major League record 56-game hitting streak was halted at the halfway point. Against Reds starter Johnny Cueto and reliever Jonathan Broxton on Friday, Arenado went 0-for-3 with a walk, snapping the bid.

In his first three plate appearances, Arenado struck out, grounded out to first, and popped out to first. He had what appeared to be his final shot at keeping the streak alive in the ninth inning, but worked the count well and ultimately drew a walk. He quickly came around to score on Justin Morneau’s double, tying the game at 3-3. However, Joey Votto squelched any hope for a fifth at-bat, leading off the bottom of the ninth with a walk-off solo home run against Rockies lefty reliever Boone Logan.

During the streak, which lasted from April 9 to May 8, Arenado slashed .360/.383/.568 with four home runs and 20 RBI.

Most teams will have a hard cap of $4.75 million to spend on international signings

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO - MARCH 13:  A fan flies the Dominican Republic flag during the game against Cuba during Round 2 of the World Baseball Classic on March 13, 2006 at Hiram Bithorn Stadium in San Juan, Puerto Rico.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)
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Ben Badler of Baseball America reports the breakdown of the international signing limits each team is subject to under the new Collective Bargaining Agreement. As you’ll recall, for the first time, teams are subject to a hard cap on the amount they can spend on such players.

While most reports of the new rules for international free agents talked about the cap as being “between $5-6 million,” in reality, the majority of teams will be subject to a cap of $4.75 million. Indeed, 16 of baseball’s 30 teams are limited to that number. Six others will have up to $5.25 million to spend and eight will have up to $5.75 million.

Only signings of players aged 25 and over who have six years or more of professional experience in, say, Japan or in Cuba, are exempt from the cap.

2016 postseason playoff shares announced

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OXON HILL, Md — There used to be a time when postseason money was bigger than most players’ actual salaries. Winning a pennant in baseball’s Golden Age was great for its own sake, but if you were one of the guys who hung around with, say, the Yankees for a long time like Frank Crosetti, the money was basically life-changing. It could also be life-changing if you happened to play on a team with Rickey Henderson.

That’s not the case any longer, but the money is still pretty good, as evidenced by the postseason shares handed out for this past postseason, which were just announced and are set forth below.

Shares come from the “players’ pool,” which calculated by taking 50 percent of the gate receipts from the Wild Card Games; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first three games of the Division Series; 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the League Championship Series; and 60 percent of the gate receipts from the first four games of the World Series.  The players’ pool is divided among the 10 Postseason Clubs. The 2016 players’ pool was a record total of $76,627,827.09. Last year it was $69,882,149.26.

The clubs themselves decide how many shares to allocate, with the players making decisions regarding which part timers, cup-of-coffee callups, staffers, etc. get. They also have the ability to hand out straight cash awards in whatever amount they want as opposed to a percentage cut of the postseason money.

The breakdown:

  • Chicago Cubs (Share of Players’ Pool: $27,586,017.75; value of each of full share: $368,871.59) – The Cubs issued 66 full shares, a total of 8.7 partial shares and four cash awards;
  • Cleveland Indians (Share of Players’ Pool: $18,390,678.50; value of each of full share: $261,804.65) – The Indians issued 60 full shares, a total of 8.75 partial shares and 16 cash awards.
  • Los Angeles Dodgers (Share of Players’ Pool: $9,195,339.25; value of each of full share: $123,741.24) – The Dodgers issued 65 full shares, a total of 8.285 partial shares and 20 cash awards.
  • Toronto Blue Jays (Share of Players’ Pool: $9,195,339.25; value of each of full share: $123,045.09) – The Blue Jays issued 66 full shares, a total of 7.75 partial shares and 15 cash awards.
  • Boston Red Sox (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $33,761.22) – The Red Sox issued 61 full shares, a total of 10.686 partial shares and 14 cash awards.
  • San Francisco Giants (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $36,443.03) – The Giants issued 57 full shares, a total of 10.5 partial shares and nine cash awards.
  • Texas Rangers (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $38,422.69) – The Rangers issued 54 full shares, a total of 10.19 partial shares and seven cash awards.
  • Washington Nationals (Share of Players’ Pool: $2,490,404.38; value of each of full share: $35,442.68) – The Nationals issued 60 full shares, a total of 10.209 partial shares and one cash award.
  • Baltimore Orioles (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,149,417.41; value of each of full share: $18,351.02) – The Orioles issued 52 full shares, a total of 8.36 partial shares and 30 cash awards.
  • New York Mets (Share of Players’ Pool: $1,149,417.41; value of each of full share: $17,951.65) – The Mets issued 51 full shares, a total of 12.75 partial shares and five cash awards.