Bryce Harper: please show yourself out

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Some people think Bryce Harper is the seventh best Nationals player. I don’t think that. That’s just the odd CW that has developed in the last week or so because someone, somewhere thinks that he needs to be taught a lesson, learn his place or who the heck knows what.

But my god, he needs to be put in detention for this tweet during last night’s NFL Draft:

The best part of it is that right before I saw that tweet, I saw a bunch of people tweeting about how if you make a “Clown question, bro” joke about the Clowney pick, you’re pretty much the worst hack Twitter comedian ever:

Part of me hopes Harper purely and innocently came up with that on his own. Part of me hopes he was reading Berman’s feed and decided to mess with everyone. Either way, it’s just reason number 3,443,259 that I don’t watch the draft. I watched “Kill Bill Vol. 1” on Netflix and then the first couple innings of the Dodgers-Giants game. And I feel so much better about that.

David DeJesus retires

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Outfielder David DeJesus announced his retirement from Major League Baseball on Twitter Wednesday afternoon. He’ll be joining CSN Chicago for Cubs coverage.

DeJesus, 37, spent 13 seasons in the big leagues from 2003-15 with the Royals, Athletics, Cubs, Nationals, Rays, and Angels. He hit a composite .275/.349/.512 with 99 home runs and 573 RBI across 5,916 plate appearances.

We wish the best of luck to DeJesus as he begins a new career in sports media.

Dallas Green: 1934-2017

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Former major league pitcher, manager, and front office executive Dallas Green has died at the age of 82, Jon Heyman of FanRag Sports reports.

Green pitched for the Phillies for the first five years of his career from 1960-64, then went to the Washington Sentators, the Mets, and back to the Phillies before retiring after the ’67 season. He managed the Phillies from 1979-81, leading them to the organization’s first ever championship in ’80. The Cubs hired Green after the 1981 season to serve as executive vice president and general manager. He quit after the ’87 season. Green briefly managed the Yankees in ’89, then took the helm of the Mets from ’93-96.

Green was a controversial figure during his managing and GM days as he was not afraid to say exactly what he was thinking. He got into many conflicts with his players and coaches, but some think it helped the Phillies in the World Series in 1980. The Phillies inducted him into their Wall of Fame in 2006.