What’s the point of a mound visit?

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The most famous mound visit in history was Robert Wuhl’s “candlesticks” mound visit in “Bull Durham.” But according to Dirk Hayhurst, it’s not necessarily overly-exaggerated. Given how little time a manager or a pitching coach has to say to a pitcher in trouble, and given how few things a pitcher can actually adjust on the fly, sometimes those visits are more about getting the pitcher out of his own head than anything else:

Sometimes a coach will make the walk out, ask you about how your girlfriend is in the sack and then stand there while you giggle, saying nothing about pitching at all. Sometimes he’ll come out and just stare at you, waiting for the umpire to show up so he can rip him a new one over how bad his zone is . . . The best coaches know their players’ personalities, what motivates or defeats them.

It’s a great column on a art form not many of us know anything about. And a great argument for putting microphones on pitching coaches. Do that, throw a five second delay on it for the F-bombs and you have vastly increased the entertainment factor of a broadcast.

The Angels were the first team to use up all of their mound visits

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Last night’s Angels-Astros game was a long affair with a bunch of homers and the use of 11 pitchers in all. The Angels used six pitchers and all of that business led to plenty of conferences. Six, in fact, which is their allotment under the new rule capping mound visits. As far as I can tell, that makes the Angels the first team to use up all of their mound visits since the advent of the rule.

Sadly, they did not try to go for a seventh, thereby testing the currently unknown limits of the rule. Umpires have been instructed to not allow additional mound visits, but they cannot issue balls or tackle anyone or anything to enforce it. Presumably, if Maldonado had walked out to talk to Cam Bedrosian about the weather or where he was going to dinner after the game, the home plate umpire would’ve simply done the old Robin Williams English policeman’s bit of yelling “Stop! . . . or I shall yell ‘Stop!’ again!” Maybe a fine would issue later, but we’ll never know.

At least until someone breaks the limit. And we know someone will, right? We should have a betting pool on who does it.