Chris Sale is still about 10-14 days away from a rehab assignment

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Just when Chris Sale could be ready to rejoin the White Sox remains a mystery, but he took a step in the right direction today. According to Dan Hayes of CSNChicago.com, the southpaw threw 40 pitches in a light bullpen session and said he felt “much better than when we started this process.”

Sale has been sidelined since April 17 due to a left flexor muscle strain. The White Sox have played things close to the vest about a potential timeline for his return, but general manager Rick Hahn estimated today that a rehab assignment is possible in 10-14 days if he continues to make progress.

“I don’t see what is to be gained by (talking),” Hahn said. “It’s more art than science when you are starting to rebuild a guy back. Right now clinically he feels great and he’s progressing, but I don’t want to put a marker in the sand saying he’s going to do this on Day 4 because if for some reason he doesn’t do this on Day 4, it creates panic. In reality it’s just a natural process of rebuilding a guy’s arm strength.”

Sale, 25, posted a 2.30 ERA and 29/7 K/BB ratio in 27 1/3 innings over four starts prior to landing on the disabled list.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.