Washington Nationals v Miami Marlins

Kevin Frandsen still unhappy with how things ended with Phillies

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In March 2011, the Phillies signed Kevin Frandsen to a minor league deal. He performed well enough with Triple-A Lehigh Valley, but the Phillies didn’t have a use for him. He stuck around with the Phillies on another minor league deal in 2012 and earned a call-up in late July, hitting .338 with an .834 OPS in 210 plate appearances. In 2013, his overall production tailed off significantly, but he led the league in pinch-hits with 14.

While he wasn’t exactly starter material, he was a quality bench bat or, if the Phillies cared about things like platoon splits, a good platoon bat given his career .771 OPS against left-handed pitchers. Stunningly, the depth-lacking Phillies couldn’t find room for Frandsen on their bench going into 2014, opting to cut him towards the end of March. Frandsen became a free agent and signed with the Nationals on a one-year, $900,000 contract a few days later.

Frandsen still isn’t happy about the way things ended with the Phillies. He says he was blindsided by their decision to cut him. Via CSN Philly’s Jim Salisbury:

“I was pissed,” said Frandsen, looking back at the Phillies’ decision. “I earned my way to being on the bench, to being a vital part over there. That’s what I thought and that’s the feeling I have and I’m going to go with it.”

[…]

“I don’t care what it was on timing and circumstance,” Frandsen said. “I earned my way. I earned my right to have that contract. I went about it the right way to be on that team over there. It didn’t happen.”

Frandsen, who led the majors with 14 pinch hits for the Phillies in 2013, has found happiness in Washington.

“We’re four games over .500 here, and I’m loving that,” he said. “I’m loving winning.”

Frandsen has performed well for the Nationals, carrying a .714 OPS into Friday’s action. Meanwhile, Phillies pinch-hitters have slashed .194/.257/.387. They have had MLB-worst production out of third basemen Cody Asche, Freddy Galvis, and Jayson Nix with an aggregate .478 OPS. Outfielder John Mayberry, Jr. has the highest OPS among the team’s bench players at .673.

As Adam Kilgore wrote in his column on the subject, “It’s hard to imagine Frandsen wouldn’t be one of the Phillies’ best 25 players.” In fact, Frandsen might’ve been one of the top-ten most productive players on the Phillies’ current roster.

The Phillies have shut down Jake Thompson

CLEARWATER, FL - MARCH 03:  Jake Thompson #75 of the Philadelphia Phillies throws a pitch during the first inning of a spring training game against the Houston Astros at Bright House Field on March 3, 2016 in Clearwater, Florida.  (Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)
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Phillies rookie starter Jake Thompson has been shut down for the year. Not that there’s much of the year left, but he will not make what would’ve been his last start.

Thompson allowed three earned runs over four innings in the Phillies’ 17-0 blowout loss to the Mets. That leaves him with a 5.70 ERA in 53.2 innings for the season. Which, while that’s kind of ugly, it was a function of some bad starts mixed in with good starts as opposed to overall badness.

Everything about his 2016 should be viewed as “get yourself used to the big leagues, because you’re going to be part of this rotation in 2017 and beyond,” and from that perspective, you can call 2016 a success.

Congressional candidate uses Jose Fernandez’s death to score political points

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As a horrible Sunday unfolded yesterday there was at least one thing buoying the public mood: the overwhelming outpouring of emotion and love for Jose Fernandez and warm remembrances of his all-too-brief time on Earth.

But it wasn’t a unanimous sentiment. Some people, like this Florida state representative who is currently running for Congress, thought it was a great time to make a political point:

Setting aside the tastelessness of Gaetz’s timing and intent, one wonders if he appreciates that the reason Fernandez risked his life on multiple occasions was specifically so he could live in a country where protesting and not exhibiting a reflexive loyalty and patriotism is a fundamental right and does not get you thrown in jail.

But really, it’s the tastelessness which most galls here.