Derek Jeter Robinson Cano

And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Mariners 6, Yankees 3: Robinson Cano made his return to Yankee Stadium and got booed, which is no biggie. This is hilarious, though. From the AP gamer:

Cano got a mock cheer when he struck out to end the inning, then was met with chants of “You sold out!” from the Bleacher Creatures when he took his spot at second base.

Yankee Bleacher Creatures ripping someone for selling out while they do the silly roll calls thing or whatever it is to Jacoby Ellsbury, Brian McCann and any number of other dudes the Yankees have bought over the years is very, very special. But then again, the world is made for people who aren’t cursed with self-awareness.

Athletics 9, Rangers 3: Martin Perez’s scoreless innings/shutout streak ended pretty abruptly as Derek Norris hit a two-run double in the first and the A’s never trailed. Norris had another RBI double later. Perez allowed eight runs he had only allowed six total through his first five starts. Mama said there’d be days like this.

Red Sox 7, Rays 4: A five-run rally in the sixth put this one away. Shane Victorino went 4 for 4 and drove in two. Five games into this road trip, the Rays are 1-4.

Mets 6, Phillies 1: The Mets have won seven of nine. An hour and a half rain delay and then temperatures in the low 40s made this one unpleasant otherwise. Certainly for Cole Hamels, who said he was “truly embarrassed” after the game for not giving his team a chance. Jon Niese helped with that of course, allowing one run on four hits in seven innings.

Tigers 4, White Sox 3: Bryan Holaday’s RBI bunt single in the top of the ninth won it for Detroit. He went 2 for 4 overall. Jose Quintana struck out 10 in six innings, but got the no-decision. Effing Quintana. That creep can roll, man. 

Editor’s Note: Hardball Talk‘s partner FanDuel is hosting a one-day $45,000 Fantasy Baseball league for Wednesday night’s MLB games. It’s $25 to join and first prize is $7,000. Starts at 7:05pm ET on WednesdayHere’s the FanDuel link.

Nationals 4, Astros 3: Adam LaRoche hit the game-tying double in the eighth inning and the go-ahead single in the ninth. LaRoche his hitting .312 with four homers, 17 RBI and 16 walks so far this year. Not bad for a guy who is traditionally a slow starter.

Marlins 9, Braves 0: The Braves got shellacked, but my man-crush Jose Fernandez tossed eight shutout innings Thus:

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Royals 10, Blue Jays 5: Sal Perez homered and drove in four. The Royals sent 10 men to the plate in the eighth. The Jays’ pen gave up seven runs in two innings after Dustin McGowan left with a lead.

Reds 3, Cubs 2: Billy Hamilton was 3 for 4 with a homer, two infield singles and a walk. He also stole a base and made a diving catch in center. Sort of the platonic ideal of a Billy Hamilton game.

Brewers 5, Cardinals 4: Two games against the Cards, two extra innings wins for the Brewers. Khris Davis hit an RBI triple and started the winning rally in the 12th with a leadoff double. He came home on Lyle Overbay’s RBI single. An RBI single he hit after failing four times to get a bunt down to move Davis over. This should be taken as a lesson from the cosmos that bunting is bad. Well, unless you’re Bryan Holaday in that Tigers game, but that’s just an instance of the cosmos testing our faith. 

Rockies 5, Diamondbacks 4: The Diamondbacks have lost 22 games. A couple of teams in the majors have only played 22 so far this year. Just a tire fire.

Giants 6, Padres 0Matt Cain was scratched after cutting his right index finger on a kitchen knife in the Giants clubhouse before the game. Yusmeiro Petit took the mound instead and if you think he couldn’t cut it, well, you’re wrong, as he tossed six shutout innings. Really carved the Padres up. God, please help me.

Angels 6, Indians 4: Howie Kendrick — leading off for the first time this year — had a two-run single. Chris Iannetta hit a pair of RBI singles. The Indians have lost five straight.

Pirates vs. Orioles; Dodgers vs. Twins: POSTPONED: Sadly we don’t get to see the 1965, 1971 and 1979 World Series rematches thanks to rain. But then again: Rain is grace; rain is the sky condescending to the earth; without rain, there would be no life.

It’s pretty stupid that athletes can’t endorse beer

San Francisco Giants starting pitcher Madison Bumgarner celebrates after pitching the Giants to a 8-0 win over the Pittsburgh Pirates in the National League wild card game in Pittsburgh Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar) ORG XMIT: PAGP102
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One of the more amusing things to spin out of the Super Bowl were Peyton Manning’s little Budweiser endorsements in his postgame interviews. It was hilarious, really, to see him shoehorn in references to going and cracking a crisp cool Budweiser multiple times. It was more hilarious when a Budweiser representative tweeted that Manning was not paid to do that. Of course, Manning owns an interest in alcohol distributorships so talking about The King of Beers was in his best financial interest all the same.

After that happened people asked whether or not Manning would face discipline about this from the NFL, as players are not allowed to endorse alcoholic beverages. This seemed crazy to me. I had no idea that they were actually banned from doing so. Then I realized that, huh, I can’t for the life of me remember seeing beer commercials with active athletes, so I guess maybe it’s not so crazy. Ken Rosenthal later tweeted that Major League Baseball has a similar ban in place. No alcohol endorsements for ballplayers.

Why?

I mean, I can fully anticipate why the leagues would say athletes can’t do it. Think of the children! Role models! Messages about fitness! All that jazz. I suspect a more significant reason is that the leagues and their partners — mostly Anheuser-Busch/InBev — would prefer not to allow high-profile athletes to shill for a competitor. How bad would it look for Alex Rodriguez to do spots for Arrogant Bastard Ale when there are Budweiser signs hanging in 81% of the league’s ballparks? Actually, such ads would look WONDERFUL, but you know what I mean here.

That aside, it does strike me as crazy hypocritical that the leagues can rake in as much as they do from these companies while prohibiting players from getting in on the action. If it is kids they’re worried about, how can they deny that they endorse beer to children every bit as effectively and possibly more so than any one athlete can by virtue of putting it alongside the brands that are the NFL and MLB? Personally I don’t put much stock in a think-of-the-children argument when it comes to beer — it’s everywhere already and everyone does a good job of pushing the “drink responsibly” message — but if those are the leagues’ terms, they probably need to ask themselves how much of a distinction any one athlete and the entire league endorsing this stuff really is.

That aside, sports and beer — often sponsored by active players — have a long, long history together:

Musial

And the picture at the top of this post certainly shows us that Major League Baseball has no issues whatsoever in having its players endorse Budweiser in a practical sense.

Why can’t they get paid for doing it?

The Orioles signed Rafael Palmeiro’s son

Rafael Palmeiro
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Last summer we posted about Rafael Palmeiro coming out of retirement to play for the independent league Sugar Land Skeeters. The reason: to play a game with his boy Patrick. In that game the elder Palmeiro went 2-for-4 with an RBI, a walk, and a run scored. His son, who is now 26, went 2-for-4 with a grand slam.

Did that serve as an audition for Patrick? Possibly, as Jon Meloi of the Baltimore Sun reports that the Orioles just signed him to a minor league deal.

As Meloi notes, it’s certainly just an organizational depth move, as Patrick is no prospect. And it’s actually likely something of a coincidence that it’s the Orioles who signed him, as Palmeiro doesn’t have any real contacts with the Orioles baseball operations people, all of whom are different folks now than back in his day.

This may not be the last of the Palmeiros, by the way. Peter Gammons tweeted this morning that Patrick’s younger brother, Preston, is a first baseman at North Carolina State who could be drafted this june. Gammons says he has a swing “remarkably similar to dad.”

Diamondbacks, A.J. Pollock avoid arbitration with two-year contract

Arizona Diamondbacks center fielder A.J. Pollock drives in two runs against the Cincinnati Reds during the eighth inning of a baseball game, Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/Gary Landers)
AP Photo/Gary Landers
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Steve Gilbert of MLB.com reports that the Diamondbacks and outfielder A.J. Pollock have avoided arbitration by agreeing to a two-year extension. The deal is worth $10.25 million, per ESPN’s Buster Olney.

Pollock was arbitration-eligible for the first time this winter. The 28-year-old requested $3.9 million and was offered $3.65 million by the Diamondbacks when figures were exchanged on January 15. It wasn’t much of a gap, but the two sides were ultimately able to find common ground on a multi-year deal. Pollock will still be under team control for one more year after this new deal expires.

Pollock is coming off a breakout 2015 where he batted .315/.367/.498 with 20 home runs, 76 RBI, and 39 stolen bases over 157 games. He ranked sixth among position players with 7.4 WAR (Wins Above Replacement), according to Baseball Reference.

Report: Blue Jays and Josh Donaldson agree to two-year, $29 million extension

Toronto Blue Jays' Josh Donaldson celebrates his two run home run against the Kansas City Royals during the third inning in Game 3 of baseball's American League Championship Series on Monday, Oct. 19, 2015, in Toronto. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
AP Photo/Paul Sancya
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The Blue Jays and 2015 American League Most Valuable Player Josh Donaldson have avoided arbitration by agreeing to a two-year, $29 million contract, reports Shi Davidi of Sportsnet.ca.

Donaldson was arbitration-eligible for the second time this winter. He filed for $11.8 million and was offered $11.35 million by the Blue Jays when figures were exchanged last month. It wasn’t a big gap, but since the Blue Jays are a “file and trial” team, they bring these cases to an arbitration hearing unless a multi-year deal can be worked out. As opposed to last winter, they were able to avoid a hearing this time around. Donaldson was originally a Super Two player, so he’ll still have one year of arbitration-eligibility once this two-year deal is completed.

The 30-year-old Donaldson is coming off a monster first season in Toronto where he batted .297/.371/.568 with 41 homers while leading the American League with 123 RBI.