Robinson Cano on Seattle: “It’s more relaxed”, “not as intense as New York”

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Following Sunday afternoon’s win over the Rangers, the Mariners went to 10-14, but still sit just two games ahead of the lowly Astros for last place in the AL West. There are plenty of reasons why second baseman Robinson Cano might have regrets after signing a ten-year, $240 million contract with the Mariners back in December, particularly since he could have gotten the same years and the same money elsewhere.

Cano, though, seems quite content. Via Newsday’s Anthony Rieber:

“I like it here,” the now-bearded Cano said. “It’s nice. The team’s really nice. I like the team, the city. Playing baseball, the fans, it’s really nice. Here it’s more relaxed. It’s not as intense as New York. In New York, when the game is over, everyone is looking at what’s wrong. Here we don’t have that.”

Cano makes his return to the Bronx on Tuesday when the Mariners are in town to play the Yankees. He’ll likely hear plenty of boos from fans who either didn’t like his perceived lack of hustle while wearing Yankee pinstripes, or who now view him as a turncoat for following the money out of New York. But it will only be Cano’s problem from April 28 to May 1. Beyond that, he won’t have to hear it from the Bronx faithful until next season.

Video: Troy Tulowitzki plays along with a photographer who thought he was a pitcher

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
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Thursday marked photo day for the Blue Jays. There are always some oddities, usually when the players create fun for themselves. This time, the fun happened when a photographer mistook shortstop Troy Tulowitzki for a pitcher. Tulowitzki rolled with it and followed the photographer’s instructions to pose like a pitcher.

Hazel Mae has the hilarious video:

Hitters, of course, typically pose with a bat over their shoulder. Pitchers typically have their hand in their glove, sometimes leaning forward as if receiving the signs from their catcher.

Tulowitzki has exclusively played shortstop during his 12-year career in the majors, but perhaps one day he’ll step on the mound and be able to call himself a pitcher.