Jesse Crain’s latest injury problem: bursitis in his right elbow

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Jesse Crain’s last two years have been a bumpy ride. As a reliever with the White Sox, Crain landed on the 60-day disabled list in early July last season with a strained right shoulder. Despite the injury, the Rays decided to gamble and traded for him in late July, hoping he’d be able to make a return and help the team for a playoff push in September. It never materialized.

Crain became a free agent, underwent shoulder surgery in October, and eventually signed with the Astros on a one-year, $3.25 million deal. The Astros were making a similar gamble as the Rays, hopeful that Crain would be healthy enough to contribute at some point during the season.

Crain strained his calf early in spring training, adding insult to literal injury. And now there’s even more. As Jose de Jesus Ortiz of the Houston Chronicle reports, Crain has developed bursitis in his right shoulder. Bursitis is the inflammation of the bursae sacs of synovial fluid. They sit where muscle and tendons slide across the bone, allowing for movement without friction. As a result of the latest developments, GM Jeff Luhnow scrapped Crain’s most recent timetable of early May, and did not offer an updated timetable.

The Astros could have certainly used the help. They enter Friday night’s action with the fourth-worst bullpen ERA in baseball at 5.45, behind only the Tigers, Phillies, and White Sox. In the 36 2/3 innings Crain pitched leading up to his initial injury last season, Crain had a 0.74 ERA along with 46 strikeouts and 10 unintentional walks. The 32-year-old has a career 3.05 ERA over 532 innings.

Mets invite Tim Tebow to spring training

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Tim Tebow isn’t letting go of his major league dreams just yet. The former NFL quarterback is slated to appear with the Mets during spring training this year, extending what initially looked like an ill-fated career choice for at least one more season. Per the club’s official announcement on Friday, he’ll join a group of spring training invitees that includes top-30 prospects like Peter Alonso, P.J. Conlon, Patrick Mazeika and David Thompson.

Tebow, 30, hasn’t taken to professional baseball as gracefully as expected. He batted a cumulative .226/.309/.347 with eight home runs and a .656 OPS in 486 plate appearances for Single-A Columbia and High-A St. Lucie in 2017. While that wasn’t enough to compel the Mets to give the aging outfielder a big league tryout, there’s no denying that Tebow brought substantial benefit to their minor league affiliates — in the form of increased attendance figures and ticket sales, that is.

Even after the Mets were booted from the NL East race last September, they resisted the idea of promoting Tebow for a late-season attendance boost of their own. That’s not to say they’re planning on taking the same approach in 2018; Tebow will undoubtedly get his cup of coffee in the majors at some point, but for now, a Grapefruit League tryout is likely as close as he’ll ever get to playing with the team’s big league roster on an everyday basis.