Wanna buy a $14,000 baseball glove?


And the kicker here is that it’s not that expensive due it to being worn by Mickey Mantle or autographed by Satchel Paige. It’s $14,100 because, well, it has the Hermès name on it and rich people may buy this crap. From the Marketwatch story in which I found this atrocity:

What makes the glove so expensive? Begin with the “absolutely top-grade” France-sourced leather, Chavez explains. (Hermès refers to it as “gold swift calfskin” leather, though there’s no actual gold involved.) Then factor in the hand-stitching and construction. “It takes 25 hours for one person to make this glove,” Chavez adds. Plus, there’s the Hermès name, which carries a certain cachet.

As Marketwatch notes, major leaguers’ gloves usually cost around $200 and rarely over $500. You can get a nice glove at a sporting goods store far cheaper than that.

If you buy this thing, you are essentially buying a ticket to be the first one against the wall when the revolution comes.

(Thanks to Gary Hagen for the heads up)


Jeff Samardzija to undergo MRI on right shoulder

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Update (12:58 AM ET): Per Henry Schulman of the San Francisco Chronicle, Samardzija has been diagnosed with a strained pectoral muscle. He’ll be shut down for a week. That’s good news for the Giants, considering the alternatives.


Giants starter Jeff Samardzija will undergo an MRI on his ailing right shoulder, according to NBC Sports Bay Area. The right-hander struggled in a minor league game on Wednesday, surrendering a pair of home runs and hitting a batter. Overall this spring, Samardzija has given up 15 runs (13 earned) on 17 hits (six homers) and seven walks with seven strikeouts in 11 innings.

This may mean Samardzija won’t be ready for the start of the regular season. Derek Holland would likely replace Samardzija in the rotation. Holland had been competing for the No. 5 spot in the Giants’ rotation.

Samardzija led the National League in losses last season with 15, also posting a 4.42 ERA with a 205/32 K/BB ratio in a league-high 207 2/3 innings. Since becoming a starter, Samardzija has been able to avoid injury, making 32 or 33 starts in each of the last five seasons.