Brian Matusz makes a special connection with a fan who shares his peanut allergy

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Orioles pitcher Brian Matusz, like several million Americans, is allergic to peanuts. So much so that he had a bad reaction during spring training that required him to go to the emergency room.

An eight-year-old boy from Georgia named Wyatt Alford also has a peanut allergy. He read about Matusz’s incident and, when visiting Sarasota for an Orioles spring training game, sought Matusz out. Ballparks being what they are, he couldn’t connect with Matusz, but at the suggestion of Orioles’ staff he wrote to him. The story about it is in the Baltimore Sun today. Specifically, about what Matusz found when he opened the envelope from Alford:

Inside the envelope was a newspaper article detailing Matusz’s frightening allergic reaction to a dinner prepared in peanut oil March 9 that sent the 27-year-old left-hander to the emergency room.

Also included in the package was a portable shot of epinephrine that allergy sufferers carry in case of a reaction. Although similar in content to the ubiquitous EpiPen, the Auvi-Q inside Matusz’s envelope was instead square and flat like a thick credit card — easy for autographing — and included audio instructions for injecting it.

I’ve talked about how autographs are weird and I don’t always get the desire for having one, but with a connection like this one — and an autograph on something so special and personalized — all that goes out the window.

 

MLBPA agrees to extend deadline for new posting agreement between MLB, NPB

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Update (7:00 PM ET): The MLBPA announces that the deadline has been extended 24 hours while MLB and NPB continue to negotiate a new agreement for the posting system. The new deadline is 8 PM ET on Tuesday.

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Last Thursday, we learned that the MLBPA was challenging the Nippon Professional Baseball posting system, delaying Japanese superstar Shohei Ohtani’s move to Major League Baseball. The latest collective bargaining agreement removed a lot of the incentive for players to come to the U.S. by capping pay. Ohtani, for example, can only receive a signing bonus between $300,000 and $3.53 million while his team — the Nippon Ham Fighters — would receive $20 million for posting him.

Jon Morosi reports that the deadline for this issue to be resolved is 8 PM ET on Monday evening. He notes that key NPB officials have worked through the night in Japan to try to reach a resolution. It is possible that even if no agreement is reached, the deadline could be pushed further back.

Ohtani, 23, has become a heralded hitter and pitcher in Japan. At the plate over his five-year career, he has compiled a .286/.358/.500 triple-slash line with 48 home runs and 166 RBI in 1,170 plate appearances. On the mound, he has a 2.52 ERA with a 624/200 K/BB ratio across 543 innings.